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Spanish Singer Manual?



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 19th 05, 08:36 AM
NightMist
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Default Spanish Singer Manual?


DD#3 is in her term of home ec at school and they have come up on what
passes for a sewing module.
She has been partnered with a girl who does not speak any english yet.
They are getting by so far useing pantomime and what few words each
has in the other's language.
It would be amazingly helpful though if they had a manual for their
sewing machine in spanish. It seems the teacher's instructions
haven't been much use even if you understand english, and she and her
classmates have been relying heavily on the manuals to learn how to
perform such arduous tasks as threading the things. DD was a bit
ahead of the game since she has used my machines, but beyond basic
threading and general function the resemblance is slim.

So, does anyone know where to find a manual in spanish for a Singer
9410? I've been to the singer site and they only have them in
english.

I confess I am a bit annoyed with the teacher. She has not given out
the usual discount cards for Joanns, she has banned cotton thread, and
she is insisting that fabric be 45" in width exactly. Yes, she sent
home the 44" fabric that I already sent in, as well as the Metrosene
that I sent with it. She said the thread was too silky and that it
would fray and mess up the machine (she must be so new she is still
wet behind the ears!). This is way too much fuss for a pair of boxer
shorts.

NightMist
--
"To repeat what others have said, requires education; to challenge
it, requires brains." -Mary Pettibone Poole
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  #2  
Old May 19th 05, 10:40 AM
Kate Dicey
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Default

NightMist wrote:

DD#3 is in her term of home ec at school and they have come up on what
passes for a sewing module.
She has been partnered with a girl who does not speak any english yet.
They are getting by so far useing pantomime and what few words each
has in the other's language.
It would be amazingly helpful though if they had a manual for their
sewing machine in spanish. It seems the teacher's instructions
haven't been much use even if you understand english, and she and her
classmates have been relying heavily on the manuals to learn how to
perform such arduous tasks as threading the things. DD was a bit
ahead of the game since she has used my machines, but beyond basic
threading and general function the resemblance is slim.

So, does anyone know where to find a manual in spanish for a Singer
9410? I've been to the singer site and they only have them in
english.


I'll have a poke about and see what I can come up with...

I confess I am a bit annoyed with the teacher. She has not given out
the usual discount cards for Joanns, she has banned cotton thread, and
she is insisting that fabric be 45" in width exactly. Yes, she sent
home the 44" fabric that I already sent in, as well as the Metrosene
that I sent with it. She said the thread was too silky and that it
would fray and mess up the machine (she must be so new she is still
wet behind the ears!). This is way too much fuss for a pair of boxer
shorts.


Please PLEASE let me boggle... BBOOGGGGGLLEE!!!! But but but...
44"/45" - where's the difference? ALL the 44/45 inch fabric I see for
sale has 'approx' written on the ticket! NOTHING is EXACTLY 45" wide,
except by cheer chance! Does this silly woman have so little experience
she does not know this? Let's face it, anything labelled 45" is going
to waver somewhere between 44" and 46" down the 50+m length it's woven in!

As for the thread... Well, words fail! Has she never heard of like
with like? Cotton thread for cotton fabric, poly for artificial fibres,
and poly mixes, silk for silk and cotton or silk for wool? And I've
never heard of Metrosene doing that, except with a damaged needle.
Maybe she doesn't know that needles need to be changed? Dearie me, what
DO they teach them these day... Kate goes off shaking head and muttering

And yes, this is WAAAAY too much fuss for boxer shorts. Erm... Who is
supposed to WEAR the boxers? Or are they for display only? Giggle

Good on your DD for taking on this project, and good on you both for
trying to find a manual the other lass can understand. Manuals in the
UK often come with French, German, Spanish and/or other languages in
them besides English.

--
Kate XXXXXX R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
  #3  
Old May 19th 05, 11:00 AM
Kate Dicey
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Default

PS:

Threading diagram:

http://www.sewusa.com/Threading_Diag..._threading.htm

This place may be able to do one for you:

http://www.sewconsult.com/id24.htm

--
Kate XXXXXX R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
  #4  
Old May 19th 05, 01:06 PM
Polly Esther
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Default

The home ec teacher burden carries forward from generation to generation.
Mine demanded that we learn how to mend runs in our nylon stockings. Really.
With a needle and brown thread.
When DS's shop class was swapped over to a home ec class for a six weeks
stint, they were all instructed to make white satin ring bearer pillows.
Imagine that.
The grandson's class was to learn to make biscuits. Biscuit making takes
decades of practice and is a fine art. It would have been so much better if
she had taught them how to approach a load of laundry.
I still fold my towels by the home ec teacher's demand. Lengthwise in
thirds, then in half and half again. They look nice on the shelf and are
easy to slip on a towel rod. We will never know what bad things would happen
to me if I try some other way but I'm sure lightening striking me would be
the first step. Polly

"Kate Dicey" wrote in message
...
PS:

Threading diagram:


http://www.sewusa.com/Threading_Diag..._threading.htm

This place may be able to do one for you:

http://www.sewconsult.com/id24.htm

--
Kate XXXXXX R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!



  #5  
Old May 19th 05, 01:21 PM
Hanne Gottliebsen
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Default

No-one in my school really like our sewing/needlework teacher, but she
must have done a decent job, 'cause we all got through it. We did a
"sewing machine drivers' lisence" (yes, really), made a tote bag and an
apron (to use in cooking class the following year), with proper turned
edges and some decorative trimmings and stuff. We also did embroidery. I
think in the one year, we all went away with tote bag, apron,
embroydered pillow, sampler bookmark(s), oh and some knitted stuff.


Neat knitting tip for people (mostly mainly kids) learning to knit: Make
a mouse! Knit a piece that is roughly 4 inches wide by however long it
seems to work, leave good tails hanging at the beginning and end. Roll
it up so that it is a 4" wide roll. Use one "tail" to pull together one
end of the roll and attach a bead for the nose. Do the same with the
other tail, but no bead and let the end hang for a mouse tail. Finally,
stich (or even glue) on felt ears. Cutest pink mouse I ever saw :-)


In the cookery/home ec class, we had to use the small electric mangle on
all the dish towels. Most boring job of all - you had to be on your own
at the back of the room. Still, better than cleaning out the fridge...

Ah, the joys of thinking back on school days :-)


Hanne in London

Polly Esther wrote:
The home ec teacher burden carries forward from generation to generation.
Mine demanded that we learn how to mend runs in our nylon stockings. Really.
With a needle and brown thread.
When DS's shop class was swapped over to a home ec class for a six weeks
stint, they were all instructed to make white satin ring bearer pillows.
Imagine that.
The grandson's class was to learn to make biscuits. Biscuit making takes
decades of practice and is a fine art. It would have been so much better if
she had taught them how to approach a load of laundry.
I still fold my towels by the home ec teacher's demand. Lengthwise in
thirds, then in half and half again. They look nice on the shelf and are
easy to slip on a towel rod. We will never know what bad things would happen
to me if I try some other way but I'm sure lightening striking me would be
the first step. Polly

"Kate Dicey" wrote in message
...

PS:

Threading diagram:



http://www.sewusa.com/Threading_Diag..._threading.htm

This place may be able to do one for you:

http://www.sewconsult.com/id24.htm

--
Kate XXXXXX R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!




  #6  
Old May 19th 05, 02:04 PM
Susan Laity Price
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Posts: n/a
Default

I thought by now all of "those" sewing teachers had been retired. I
always say that bad home-ec teachers have done more to destroy the
sewing industry than any thing else. I won't go into the long list of
terrible injustices done by my home-ec teacher years ago. One major
problem was that she didn't like those of us who came into her class
with sewing experience and went out of her way to show us that what
our mothers' taught us was wrong. Sewing should be fun and flexible.
When will the education community learn that point?

As for the Spanish, I can't help with the sewing machine manual but do
have several sewing instruction books in Spanish including quilting.
If this would be a help please contact me privately and I will send
you the titles and where to purchase them.

Susan

On Thu, 19 May 2005 07:36:13 GMT, (NightMist)
wrote:


DD#3 is in her term of home ec at school and they have come up on what
passes for a sewing module.
She has been partnered with a girl who does not speak any english yet.
They are getting by so far useing pantomime and what few words each
has in the other's language.
It would be amazingly helpful though if they had a manual for their
sewing machine in spanish. It seems the teacher's instructions
haven't been much use even if you understand english, and she and her
classmates have been relying heavily on the manuals to learn how to
perform such arduous tasks as threading the things. DD was a bit
ahead of the game since she has used my machines, but beyond basic
threading and general function the resemblance is slim.

So, does anyone know where to find a manual in spanish for a Singer
9410? I've been to the singer site and they only have them in
english.

I confess I am a bit annoyed with the teacher. She has not given out
the usual discount cards for Joanns, she has banned cotton thread, and
she is insisting that fabric be 45" in width exactly. Yes, she sent
home the 44" fabric that I already sent in, as well as the Metrosene
that I sent with it. She said the thread was too silky and that it
would fray and mess up the machine (she must be so new she is still
wet behind the ears!). This is way too much fuss for a pair of boxer
shorts.

NightMist


  #7  
Old May 19th 05, 02:48 PM
Betty in Wi
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Posts: n/a
Default

Oh, I think I can beat that! My home-ec teacher told us never to sit on a
boys lap unless we put a telephone book down first!

We had to buy a pattern according to our measurements---and they always ran
way big. Then we had to alter the pattern....my skirt fit my aunt, not me.
As far as cooking, we had to make white sauce and chocolate mousse. Like I
make those every day!!

Betty in WI

"Polly Esther" wrote in message
ink.net...
The home ec teacher burden carries forward from generation to generation.
Mine demanded that we learn how to mend runs in our nylon stockings.
Really.
With a needle and brown thread.
When DS's shop class was swapped over to a home ec class for a six
weeks
stint, they were all instructed to make white satin ring bearer pillows.
Imagine that.
The grandson's class was to learn to make biscuits. Biscuit making
takes
decades of practice and is a fine art. It would have been so much better
if
she had taught them how to approach a load of laundry.
I still fold my towels by the home ec teacher's demand. Lengthwise in
thirds, then in half and half again. They look nice on the shelf and are
easy to slip on a towel rod. We will never know what bad things would
happen
to me if I try some other way but I'm sure lightening striking me would be
the first step. Polly

"Kate Dicey" wrote in message
...
PS:

Threading diagram:


http://www.sewusa.com/Threading_Diag..._threading.htm

This place may be able to do one for you:

http://www.sewconsult.com/id24.htm

--
Kate XXXXXX R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!





  #8  
Old May 19th 05, 03:52 PM
Betsy Ross
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Posts: n/a
Default

No help with the Spanish manaul but let me add my two cents/pence about
"Practical Arts" in school.

I junior high I made a gym bag, pleated skirt, and shell top. I still use
the technique for making pleats that I learned then; calculating the size
and number of pleats based on the fabric/waist mesurements. I learned to
boil water, scramble an egg, and broil cinnamon toast.

With all those skills under my belt I didn't think I needed another Home Ec
class in high school. So I demanded to be let into the mechanical drawing
class which had only been open to boys at the time. I took the class,
learned basic drafting skills that have helped me in my professional and
personal projects. Maybe the best high school class I ever took.

Should we start another thread on the odd things the Physical Education
teachers said and did?

Susan


  #9  
Old May 19th 05, 04:01 PM
marbles_2
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Default

Goodness sakes!!! All these horrid memories of home eck teachers rising
to the surface. I had been sewing my own clothes (and Barbie
clothes.....which are just plain HARD) for several years by the time I
hit middle school home ec. I remember her screeching at me about pins
not properly lined up, stitch length, darts, blah blah blah and that
almost ended my love of sewing. We later cooked such useful things as
Baked Alaska and chocolate pudding from scratch (mine could bounce). I
had to stumble my own way through learning realistic household chores
later on in life.

I do have to give credit to my DD#3 's teacher. She taught them sewing
with pieced quilt block pillows! No special trips to the fabric store
for 45 inch fabric or matching thread. She let them find what they
could in the scrap bin. School district probably fired her.....

Annie

  #10  
Old May 19th 05, 04:39 PM
Sally Swindells
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Default

On Thu, 19 May 2005 12:06:32 GMT, "Polly Esther"
wrote:

The home ec teacher burden carries forward from generation to generation.
Mine demanded that we learn how to mend runs in our nylon stockings. Really.
With a needle and brown thread.
When DS's shop class was swapped over to a home ec class for a six weeks
stint, they were all instructed to make white satin ring bearer pillows.
Imagine that.
The grandson's class was to learn to make biscuits. Biscuit making takes
decades of practice and is a fine art. It would have been so much better if
she had taught them how to approach a load of laundry.
I still fold my towels by the home ec teacher's demand. Lengthwise in
thirds, then in half and half again. They look nice on the shelf and are
easy to slip on a towel rod. We will never know what bad things would happen
to me if I try some other way but I'm sure lightening striking me would be
the first step. Polly

At aged 10 I had to make a dreadful flannelette petticoat in blue with
pink bias binding, which no way was I going to wear. All by hand with
French seams. After that it was a yellow drawn thread dressing table
set of 3 mats.

DD at about 13 made an apron and a towelling bag. She did the tacking
(basteing) at school and then had to bring it home for 'Mummy to
machine'. Unfortunately Philippa's Mummy didn't do machining, so guess
who did two!

The towelling for the bag was to be brought to school on Monday
morning and we were away for the weekend - I can remember the panic
very conformist DD went through - she was convinced she'd be suspended
if she didn't do everything right! Fortunately she has mellowed with
age!

--
Sally at the Seaside~~~~~~~
http://community.webshots.com/user/sallyswin

 




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