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"Redwork" and Vintage Stitching....



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 23rd 03, 03:37 PM
Lula
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Default "Redwork" and Vintage Stitching....

Hello Linda,

I think you will really enjoy trying out "redwork"
embroidery......especially if you get one of the following books to
inspire and show you how.......that's how I got hooked on this type of
stitchery.....Pam Kellogg sent me the Linen Heirloom book as a
gift.....and then I sent her Embroidered Childhood Memories.......then
we bought went to a Michaels using a 40% off coupon to buy the Vintage
book! We're both crazy about vintage needlework patterns and the
techniques to create!

Here are the books that Pam and I both have.......each of the books have
easy to understand instructions, historical background info and
excellent selection of vintage patterns in black and white line drawings
to work, and color illustrations of finished projects.

There are other similar titles listed on the back cover of these books.

Learn to do Redwork
Produced by Rita Weiss
Pub: 1999 - American School of Needlework
ISBN: 0-88195-915-4
$15.95

Embroidered Childhood Memories
Authors: Brenna Hopkins & Nori Koenig
Pub: 2002 - American Quilter's Society
ISBN: 1-57432-792-5
$19.99

Vintage - Tinted Linens - Quilts
Authors: Brenna Hopkins & Nori Koenig
Pub: 2002 - Design Originals by Suzanne McNeill
$19.99

Linen Heirlooms - Vintage Linens
Authors: Brenna Hopkins & Nori Koenig
Pub: 2000 - Design Originals by Suzanne Mcneill
$19.99
---
Lula
http://www.woolydream.com
Needlework Adventures

Linda Wright wrote:

I'd love to know how to do this or a book I could learn from - sounds
like something I would like to do!

Linda in Columbia, MO



Lula wrote in message ...
FYI......the recent Martha Stewart Living magazine has a feature on bird
embroidery patterns similar to vintage red and bluework
designs.......these designs embroidered with a single floss color in a
simple outline stitch, the most popular thread color used being red,
known as Redwork.

The article features a good selection of State bird motifs to stitch.
Many birds in line drawings to choose from.

In stitching this type of embroidery, any thread color can be used or a
combination of colors to differentiate areas of the design but the main
point of this embroidery is the use of the basically simple outline
stitch to follow a line drawing, creating a piece of decorative
embroidery.

Many of these "redwork" pieces were stitched as squares and made into
quilts.....in fact my designer friend Pam Kellogg has designed and is
stitching a redwork quilt right now to go with her vintage style home.
(Martha Stewart suggests stitching the State bird motifs into a quilt).

In fact, I've learned a lot of vintage stitching ideas from Pam
Kellogg.....in fact, we're both planning to use an iron-on crayon
technique we read about in a vintage embroidery book to create pastel
colored embroidered squares using muslin to imitate the feed sacks used
during the 30's.

It was a good excuse to buy the biggest box of Crayola crayons available
in anticipation of using them to create art for iron-on designs. Thanks
to Pam, this has opened a whole new design window for me.....a new
technique to try and a new outlet for my drawings. The designs can be
very country or very elegant depending on the art used......so many
possibilities!!
---
Lula
http://www.woolydream.com
Needlework Adventures


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  #2  
Old July 23rd 03, 09:26 PM
FKBABB
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in fact, we're both planning to use an iron-on crayon
technique we read about in a vintage embroidery book to create pastel
colored embroidered squares using muslin to imitate the feed sacks used
during the 30's.

It was a good excuse to buy the biggest box of Crayola crayons available
in anticipation of using them to create art for iron-on designs.

In her book "Needlework Magic," Jane Iles includes several projects combining
the iron-on crayon technique with embroidery. Stunning, surprisingly designs,
most with an East Asian feel, based on textiles from the V & A. She specifies
a crayon especially made for this type of work by Crayola, called a "fabric
transfer crayon." I wonder what the difference is between this and what's in
the kids' coloring box.

Annie
  #3  
Old July 24th 03, 08:32 AM
Lula
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I purchased a set of the Crayola fabric transfer crayons out of
curiosity after reading your post......I might also have the Jane Iles
book, will search the bookshelves.....would love to see her "crayon"
project.

From reading the package info and directions on how-to use......these
crayons are used to transfer drawings onto fabric.....as in creating an
iron-on pattern.
These fabric crayons are especially good for the transfer of permanent
color patterns to synthetic and synthetic blend fabrics.
--------------------------------------------------
The basic technique explained in my simple terms: use the crayons to
draw and color chosen motifs on paper........lay paper on fabric with
the design face down on fabric and iron.......the paper design can be
used again as the process creates an iron-on pattern.

There are eight fairly dark colors in the package set.....a limited
palette but I imagine more effects can be created layering colors, the
amount of pressure applied and whatever other techniques one can dream
up.
--------------------------------------------------

I think the main difference between the transfer crayons vs the regular
Crayola colors are the transfer crayons are noted on the package to be
PERMANENT colors once transfered to fabric by hot iron.

So far, I've not had the chance to try out the technique of crayon
tinting muslin......I think Pam Kellogg has done some samples.....maybe
she'll post and explain what her experience has been.

Since this question was brought up, now wondering if I can use fine art
materials, the professional quality ones that feature high pigment
content such as color pencils......I have complete sets of every brand
in water color and regular color pencils and there are differences from
brand to brand. My favorites are the Swiss made Caran d'Ache and the
German made Faber-Castell - Albrecht Durer........also have a set of
high pigment painting "crayons" by Caran d'Ache, Neocolor sticks given
to me by an artist friend......well, the only way to find out is to
experiment.......I hope to get to doing this soon.

Since I was out at the local Michael's checking out the crayon
dept.....saw another brand of crayons that looked like the Crayola
brands. In fact, the brand had the same product lines, markers, color
pencils and so on with the same exact color and style of packaging too
for most of the products.

I bought the set of 101 colors, a few more than the 96 Crayola colors.
The 101 crayons are packed in a very useful, see through hard plastic
easel case that opens and props up the crayons for easy access of every
crayon color.....comes with a built in sharpener......the brand,
RoseArt, made in Taiwan....Crayolas are made in Easton, PA. Prices are
similar.
---
Lula
http://www.woolydream.com
Needlework Adventures


FKBABB wrote:

In her book "Needlework Magic," Jane Iles includes several projects combining
the iron-on crayon technique with embroidery. Stunning, surprisingly designs,
most with an East Asian feel, based on textiles from the V & A. She specifies
a crayon especially made for this type of work by Crayola, called a "fabric
transfer crayon." I wonder what the difference is between this and what's in
the kids' coloring box.

Annie


Lula wrote:

in fact, we're both planning to use an iron-on crayon
technique we read about in a vintage embroidery book to create pastel
colored embroidered squares using muslin to imitate the feed sacks used
during the 30's.

It was a good excuse to buy the biggest box of Crayola crayons available
in anticipation of using them to create art for iron-on designs.

  #4  
Old July 24th 03, 06:26 PM
Lula
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Brenda, thank you for relating your experience with the RoseArt
crayons......this was the first time I saw this brand.

You're right about these crayons not being as high quality because some
brands have more wax than pigment.....the results you got from using
these crayons shows this to be so.

I've rarely used crayons so don't have much experience with brands
overall except having a box of Crayolas as a kid.....I know this sounds
silly, because I bought the crayons for the neat box they came
in.....so, since my little niece will be visiting this weekend, I'm
going to give her the crayons but keep the box!
---
Lula
http://www.woolydream.com
Needlework Adventures

Brenda Lewis wrote:

My experience drawing with RoseArt crayons isn't good. They are
"slicker" than Crayola and don't mark as well on some kinds of paper and
the color appears more transparent. That may not be a bad thing for
fabric transfers. It has been a few years since I tried them so maybe
they are better now.

Lula wrote:
I bought the set of 101 colors, a few more than the 96 Crayola colors.
The 101 crayons are packed in a very useful, see through hard plastic
easel case that opens and props up the crayons for easy access of every
crayon color.....comes with a built in sharpener......the brand,
RoseArt, made in Taiwan....Crayolas are made in Easton, PA. Prices are
similar.


--
Brenda Lewis
WIP: J. Himsworth "I Shall Not Want" xs
J & P Coats "Dancing Snoopy" latchhook

  #5  
Old July 24th 03, 07:19 PM
Brenda Lewis
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This may sound odd but my college roommate and I colored pictures as a
study break when we were stressed. It used our eyes and brains in a
different way so it was relaxing. It was also something we could
complete quickly (a few minutes) unlike needlework or other hobbies. We
paid more for Crayola because we decided they were the best available in
our area.

Lula wrote:
Brenda, thank you for relating your experience with the RoseArt
crayons......this was the first time I saw this brand.

You're right about these crayons not being as high quality because some
brands have more wax than pigment.....the results you got from using
these crayons shows this to be so.

I've rarely used crayons so don't have much experience with brands
overall except having a box of Crayolas as a kid.....I know this sounds
silly, because I bought the crayons for the neat box they came
in.....so, since my little niece will be visiting this weekend, I'm
going to give her the crayons but keep the box!


--
Brenda Lewis
WIP: J. Himsworth "I Shall Not Want" xs
J & P Coats "Dancing Snoopy" latchhook

  #6  
Old July 25th 03, 12:00 AM
Lula
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Brenda, the pleasure you and your friend got from coloring with crayons
during stressful times in college would qualify as a form of "art
therapy"......drawing also requires good hand eye coordination.

Another type of "art" caused by stress, daydreaming or even boredom is
the way many people doodle on scrap paper, margins of books or any clear
bit of surface often subconsciously when doing something else that
leaves their hands free! Lots of interesting results, theories that have
been analyzed and studied to explain why we do it, what it means about
the individual, etc., etc, etc.......

It's great to have hobbies......since I turned my stitching hobby into a
full time business designing needlework over18 years ago, discovered in
the past few stressful years dealing with medical problems that I no
longer had a real hobby! All my stitching ended up work related sooner
or later......not complaining as I love to stitch and made all my own
models through the years both in needlepoint and cross stitch.
Even my artwork is a full time occupation.....it's ironic that I
actually have two types of art businesses, both stemming from the same
root.

It's very hard as a creative type to separate any of my "work" life to a
"private" life.....that's what artists mean about living and breathing
art 24/7......the mind never stops thinking about designing or drawing.
Even a little trip to the grocery store can inspire a new artwork.
My most odd inspiration for what turned into a very popular design was
the result of my first spine surgery!

It was fellow designer friend, Pam Kellogg that inspired me to try the
crayon tinting technique by sending me a book full of charming vintage
30's era needlework patterns.
Related indirectly to the above is my desire to design iron-on applique
panels as another outlet for my artwork.
Guess this will be my "new" hobby......for now!
---
Lula
http://www.woolydream.com
Needlework Adventures

Brenda Lewis wrote:

This may sound odd but my college roommate and I colored pictures as a
study break when we were stressed. It used our eyes and brains in a
different way so it was relaxing. It was also something we could
complete quickly (a few minutes) unlike needlework or other hobbies. We
paid more for Crayola because we decided they were the best available in
our area.

--
Brenda Lewis



Lula wrote:

Brenda, thank you for relating your experience with the RoseArt
crayons......this was the first time I saw this brand.

You're right about these crayons not being as high quality because some
brands have more wax than pigment.....the results you got from using
these crayons shows this to be so.

I've rarely used crayons so don't have much experience with brands
overall except having a box of Crayolas as a kid.....I know this sounds
silly, because I bought the crayons for the neat box they came
in.....so, since my little niece will be visiting this weekend, I'm
going to give her the crayons but keep the box!


  #7  
Old July 25th 03, 03:52 AM
Teri George
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When I was a teenager I had some fabric crayons and used them to make
designs on my t-shirts. As I remember, teddy bears were my favorite
subject.

Of course, now my interests have expanded a lot - and so have the
different kinds of art that interest me and that I participate in. I
even held my breath and took a plunge into watercolors recently. I
was actually quite pleased with my first attempts.



Teri ~~ Secure online shopping now available
at CraftSoft Publications/Design Encounters Kits
http://www.craftsoft.com
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  #8  
Old July 25th 03, 05:00 PM
Teri George
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On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 08:21:58 GMT, Lula
wrote:

That's great you're trying out watercolors Teri! What are you painting?


I started out with landscapes. I'd like to try some close-ups of
flowers, now. I'd probably do that from pictures, though, rather than
sitting out in the garden. I'm enough of a novice that I'd worry
about the paints drying out - and we won't even discuss that I'm
allergic to bee stings!

The obvious thing to do with any new medium is to jump in and use it!
I love trying new art mediums myself and have tried almost everything
except mixing my own colors


I need to buy more colors for my acrylics. I tried mixing some colors
but I was starting with colors that weren't true enough to go where I
wanted. I tried doing purples but they kept turning out grayish. I
tried those on some canvas but wasn't happy with the result. Still, I
do like the way the acrylics flow. Of course, OTOH, the watercolors
do wonderful, ephemeral kinds of shading.

....also find the color choices to be somewhat limiting.


*grin* That makes me feel better, that *you* would find the colors
limiting!

I'm looking forward to experimenting with the crayon tinting
technique......plan on using various crayons, including the fine art
ones.....then will use the finished fabric paintings to incorporate into
other textile arts or collage.


Now *that's* multi-media!



Teri ~~ Secure online shopping now available
at CraftSoft Publications/Design Encounters Kits
http://www.craftsoft.com
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  #9  
Old July 25th 03, 06:36 PM
Dianne Lewandowski
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Teri George wrote:
and we won't even discuss that I'm
allergic to bee stings!


I'm really sorry to hear about that particular allergy! It can be
life-threatening.

I do want to remind people, however, that unless you try to kill one by
swatting, grabbing, or stepping on one (accidentally or on purpose) -
bees will normally NEVER sting you. They are quite docile. That
includes big bumblebees. I work around bees all the time in the garden.
I remember how scared I was the first time.

Not saying it is you - but people get very confused about bees and
hornets and *consistently* call hornets "bees" because they kinda look
like them. Well, they really don't, but to the normal, non-observant
person - they do. This is my crusade. You wouldn't call a sparrow a
robin. Don't call a hornet a bee.

Hornets are ornery and will sting you just because things are going
wrong that day. Bad day at the stamens, or the flower color was wrong.

Hornets have a different flying pattern, flock to your food, love the
smell of your body and will hover and intimidate you just for the heck
of it.

Wasps usually leave you alone, but are more easily provoked than bees.

Hornets are just, well, menopausal with a capital M.

They are not bees. Don't call them bees. Learn the difference. Bees
are necessary. Hornets are expendable. At least where I live. :-) In
spring, when they first awaken, I stand vigilant with wasp spray. In
fall, I stay in the house! They love grocery bags.

Dianne


  #10  
Old July 30th 03, 11:56 AM
Teri George
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On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 12:36:43 -0500, Dianne Lewandowski
wrote:

Teri George wrote:
and we won't even discuss that I'm
allergic to bee stings!


Wasps usually leave you alone, but are more easily provoked than bees.

Hornets are just, well, menopausal with a capital M.

They are not bees. Don't call them bees. Learn the difference. Bees
are necessary. Hornets are expendable. At least where I live. :-) In
spring, when they first awaken, I stand vigilant with wasp spray. In
fall, I stay in the house! They love grocery bags.


LOL!! Would it be better if I said that I'm allergic to many
venomous insects??

I didn't have an allergy until one day when I lived down South and was
bitten by a red ant. After that I developed a sensitivity to other
bites/stings. So far, I've only gotten as far as having a hard time
breathing, but I wouldn't want it to get any worse than that - and I
don't think I'll try out various stings to see which ones I'll react
to.

The last time I was stung (by a wasp or hornet that hadn't been
provoked and didn't stay around to be identified) was back in the 80s,
so maybe the reaction's gone away? (Hopeful thought.)


Teri ~~ Secure online shopping now available
at CraftSoft Publications/Design Encounters Kits
http://www.craftsoft.com
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