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Dorset crosswheel button instructions



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 16th 05, 09:27 PM
spinninglilac
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dorset crosswheel button instructions

Found this on the net if anyone is interested and wants to try it out. This
says to make them with Linen thread, but we make them out of yarn, adding
beads to the spokes etc..Bit of history then how to do them...Cheers...Cher

Here is a variation in the directions:
From The Lady's Guide to Plain Sewing, Book II:

The buttons usually used for shirts and personal linen were thread buttons.
A well organized cottage industry, begun in 1622, in Dorset, England, gave
rise to the name of numerous styles, including the Dorset Crosswheel. First
bone discs then metal rings were used to make many of the buttons. They
should be made without a break in the ring, such as those used for Roman
shades and curtains. Those of 3/8 inch inside diameter are a good size.

To make a dorset crosswheel button, a linen thread of 40/2 or a similar
size, usually bleached, is used to stitch the buttons. You will need a piece
at least two yards long for each button.

The first step is called casting: using a small, blunt needle, make
buttonhole stitches all around the ring, spacing the stitches very closely,
and completely covering the ring. The knots, or pearls, of the stitches,
will lay to the outside of the ring.

The second step is called slicking: twist the buttonhole stitches around the
ring, so that the knots, or pearls, are on the inside of the ring. Use the
needle to catch some of the pearls, and begin the twisting with a lever like
action. After the twisting is started, it is usually quite easy to finish
the slicking with the fingers.

The third step is called laying: holding the ring firmly with the fingers of
one hand, and the thread pulled taunt by the other, wrap the thread around
the ring, making "spokes". Usually, tweleve spokes are made. With your
imagination, divide the ring like the numbers on a clock. The thread must be
held taunt to prevent the spokes from loosening and falling off the ring.
The centers will not cross exactly at this stage. Complete this step by
securing the threads to the center with a couple of crosses stitches,
catching all of the spokes. The first crossd stitches can be adjusted to the
center using the needle to push the stitches. Cross the centers again. Check
to be sure the crossed stitches are in the middle of the ring. This is very
important!

The fourth step is called rounding: using the needle, weave around from
spoke to spoke, taking a stitch under and back over each spoke (like a
backstitch). Work from the center outward, fillin in the ring as closely as
possible. Keeo your work even and neat.

Finish the button by using a sharp needle to run the remaining thread tail
through the back of the rounding and exit at the center back of the button.
The tail may be left to use to set on the button, or may be trimmed off.

End text.



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  #2  
Old October 16th 05, 09:52 PM
Katherine
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dorset crosswheel button instructions

That is really interesting. I wish I had more time! I have saved these
instructions and the page you sent earlier, and maybe I'll get to try them
next year.

Katherine

spinninglilac wrote:
Found this on the net if anyone is interested and wants to try it
out. This says to make them with Linen thread, but we make them out
of yarn, adding beads to the spokes etc..Bit of history then how to
do them...Cheers...Cher

Here is a variation in the directions:
From The Lady's Guide to Plain Sewing, Book II:

The buttons usually used for shirts and personal linen were thread
buttons. A well organized cottage industry, begun in 1622, in Dorset,
England, gave rise to the name of numerous styles, including the
Dorset Crosswheel. First bone discs then metal rings were used to
make many of the buttons. They should be made without a break in the
ring, such as those used for Roman shades and curtains. Those of 3/8
inch inside diameter are a good size.

To make a dorset crosswheel button, a linen thread of 40/2 or a
similar size, usually bleached, is used to stitch the buttons. You
will need a piece at least two yards long for each button.

The first step is called casting: using a small, blunt needle, make
buttonhole stitches all around the ring, spacing the stitches very
closely, and completely covering the ring. The knots, or pearls, of
the stitches, will lay to the outside of the ring.

The second step is called slicking: twist the buttonhole stitches
around the ring, so that the knots, or pearls, are on the inside of
the ring. Use the needle to catch some of the pearls, and begin the
twisting with a lever like action. After the twisting is started, it
is usually quite easy to finish the slicking with the fingers.

The third step is called laying: holding the ring firmly with the
fingers of one hand, and the thread pulled taunt by the other, wrap
the thread around the ring, making "spokes". Usually, tweleve spokes
are made. With your imagination, divide the ring like the numbers on
a clock. The thread must be held taunt to prevent the spokes from
loosening and falling off the ring. The centers will not cross
exactly at this stage. Complete this step by securing the threads to
the center with a couple of crosses stitches, catching all of the
spokes. The first crossd stitches can be adjusted to the center using
the needle to push the stitches. Cross the centers again. Check to be
sure the crossed stitches are in the middle of the ring. This is very
important!

The fourth step is called rounding: using the needle, weave around
from spoke to spoke, taking a stitch under and back over each spoke
(like a backstitch). Work from the center outward, fillin in the ring
as closely as possible. Keeo your work even and neat.

Finish the button by using a sharp needle to run the remaining thread
tail through the back of the rounding and exit at the center back of
the button. The tail may be left to use to set on the button, or may
be trimmed off.

End text.



  #3  
Old October 16th 05, 10:12 PM
MRH
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dorset crosswheel button instructions

Grabbed and saved for another time. Thank you, Cher! )

Gem

"spinninglilac" wrote in message
...
Found this on the net if anyone is interested and wants to try it out.
This
says to make them with Linen thread, but we make them out of yarn, adding
beads to the spokes etc..Bit of history then how to do
them...Cheers...Cher

Here is a variation in the directions:
From The Lady's Guide to Plain Sewing, Book II:

The buttons usually used for shirts and personal linen were thread
buttons.
A well organized cottage industry, begun in 1622, in Dorset, England, gave
rise to the name of numerous styles, including the Dorset Crosswheel.
First
bone discs then metal rings were used to make many of the buttons. They
should be made without a break in the ring, such as those used for Roman
shades and curtains. Those of 3/8 inch inside diameter are a good size.

To make a dorset crosswheel button, a linen thread of 40/2 or a similar
size, usually bleached, is used to stitch the buttons. You will need a
piece
at least two yards long for each button.

The first step is called casting: using a small, blunt needle, make
buttonhole stitches all around the ring, spacing the stitches very
closely,
and completely covering the ring. The knots, or pearls, of the stitches,
will lay to the outside of the ring.

The second step is called slicking: twist the buttonhole stitches around
the
ring, so that the knots, or pearls, are on the inside of the ring. Use the
needle to catch some of the pearls, and begin the twisting with a lever
like
action. After the twisting is started, it is usually quite easy to finish
the slicking with the fingers.

The third step is called laying: holding the ring firmly with the fingers
of
one hand, and the thread pulled taunt by the other, wrap the thread around
the ring, making "spokes". Usually, tweleve spokes are made. With your
imagination, divide the ring like the numbers on a clock. The thread must
be
held taunt to prevent the spokes from loosening and falling off the ring.
The centers will not cross exactly at this stage. Complete this step by
securing the threads to the center with a couple of crosses stitches,
catching all of the spokes. The first crossd stitches can be adjusted to
the
center using the needle to push the stitches. Cross the centers again.
Check
to be sure the crossed stitches are in the middle of the ring. This is
very
important!

The fourth step is called rounding: using the needle, weave around from
spoke to spoke, taking a stitch under and back over each spoke (like a
backstitch). Work from the center outward, fillin in the ring as closely
as
possible. Keeo your work even and neat.

Finish the button by using a sharp needle to run the remaining thread tail
through the back of the rounding and exit at the center back of the
button.
The tail may be left to use to set on the button, or may be trimmed off.

End text.





  #4  
Old October 17th 05, 08:44 AM
spinninglilac
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dorset crosswheel button instructions

You will need time on your hands if you try them out Katherine, They can be
fiddly when you start to do them, As I rarely use them as buttons but for
decorations I use any size ring..lol Wool Silk whatever..Cheers....Cher

"Katherine" wrote in message
...
That is really interesting. I wish I had more time! I have saved these
instructions and the page you sent earlier, and maybe I'll get to try them
next year.

Katherine

spinninglilac wrote:
Found this on the net if anyone is interested and wants to try it
out. This says to make them with Linen thread, but we make them out
of yarn, adding beads to the spokes etc..Bit of history then how to
do them...Cheers...Cher

Here is a variation in the directions:
From The Lady's Guide to Plain Sewing, Book II:

The buttons usually used for shirts and personal linen were thread
buttons. A well organized cottage industry, begun in 1622, in Dorset,
England, gave rise to the name of numerous styles, including the
Dorset Crosswheel. First bone discs then metal rings were used to
make many of the buttons. They should be made without a break in the
ring, such as those used for Roman shades and curtains. Those of 3/8
inch inside diameter are a good size.

To make a dorset crosswheel button, a linen thread of 40/2 or a
similar size, usually bleached, is used to stitch the buttons. You
will need a piece at least two yards long for each button.

The first step is called casting: using a small, blunt needle, make
buttonhole stitches all around the ring, spacing the stitches very
closely, and completely covering the ring. The knots, or pearls, of
the stitches, will lay to the outside of the ring.

The second step is called slicking: twist the buttonhole stitches
around the ring, so that the knots, or pearls, are on the inside of
the ring. Use the needle to catch some of the pearls, and begin the
twisting with a lever like action. After the twisting is started, it
is usually quite easy to finish the slicking with the fingers.

The third step is called laying: holding the ring firmly with the
fingers of one hand, and the thread pulled taunt by the other, wrap
the thread around the ring, making "spokes". Usually, tweleve spokes
are made. With your imagination, divide the ring like the numbers on
a clock. The thread must be held taunt to prevent the spokes from
loosening and falling off the ring. The centers will not cross
exactly at this stage. Complete this step by securing the threads to
the center with a couple of crosses stitches, catching all of the
spokes. The first crossd stitches can be adjusted to the center using
the needle to push the stitches. Cross the centers again. Check to be
sure the crossed stitches are in the middle of the ring. This is very
important!

The fourth step is called rounding: using the needle, weave around
from spoke to spoke, taking a stitch under and back over each spoke
(like a backstitch). Work from the center outward, fillin in the ring
as closely as possible. Keeo your work even and neat.

Finish the button by using a sharp needle to run the remaining thread
tail through the back of the rounding and exit at the center back of
the button. The tail may be left to use to set on the button, or may
be trimmed off.

End text.





  #5  
Old October 17th 05, 08:46 AM
spinninglilac
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dorset crosswheel button instructions

As I said to Katherine, Gems, they are somewhat fiddly to do for the first
time. So you need some time to start going with them. Get larger rings and
work with yarn to start with just to get the idea.
Cheers.....Cher


"MRH" mthecarpenterATxcelcoDOTonDOTca wrote in message
...
Grabbed and saved for another time. Thank you, Cher! )

Gem

"spinninglilac" wrote in message
...
Found this on the net if anyone is interested and wants to try it out.
This
says to make them with Linen thread, but we make them out of yarn,

adding
beads to the spokes etc..Bit of history then how to do
them...Cheers...Cher

Here is a variation in the directions:
From The Lady's Guide to Plain Sewing, Book II:

The buttons usually used for shirts and personal linen were thread
buttons.
A well organized cottage industry, begun in 1622, in Dorset, England,

gave
rise to the name of numerous styles, including the Dorset Crosswheel.
First
bone discs then metal rings were used to make many of the buttons. They
should be made without a break in the ring, such as those used for Roman
shades and curtains. Those of 3/8 inch inside diameter are a good size.

To make a dorset crosswheel button, a linen thread of 40/2 or a similar
size, usually bleached, is used to stitch the buttons. You will need a
piece
at least two yards long for each button.

The first step is called casting: using a small, blunt needle, make
buttonhole stitches all around the ring, spacing the stitches very
closely,
and completely covering the ring. The knots, or pearls, of the stitches,
will lay to the outside of the ring.

The second step is called slicking: twist the buttonhole stitches around
the
ring, so that the knots, or pearls, are on the inside of the ring. Use

the
needle to catch some of the pearls, and begin the twisting with a lever
like
action. After the twisting is started, it is usually quite easy to

finish
the slicking with the fingers.

The third step is called laying: holding the ring firmly with the

fingers
of
one hand, and the thread pulled taunt by the other, wrap the thread

around
the ring, making "spokes". Usually, tweleve spokes are made. With your
imagination, divide the ring like the numbers on a clock. The thread

must
be
held taunt to prevent the spokes from loosening and falling off the

ring.
The centers will not cross exactly at this stage. Complete this step by
securing the threads to the center with a couple of crosses stitches,
catching all of the spokes. The first crossd stitches can be adjusted to
the
center using the needle to push the stitches. Cross the centers again.
Check
to be sure the crossed stitches are in the middle of the ring. This is
very
important!

The fourth step is called rounding: using the needle, weave around from
spoke to spoke, taking a stitch under and back over each spoke (like a
backstitch). Work from the center outward, fillin in the ring as closely
as
possible. Keeo your work even and neat.

Finish the button by using a sharp needle to run the remaining thread

tail
through the back of the rounding and exit at the center back of the
button.
The tail may be left to use to set on the button, or may be trimmed off.

End text.







  #6  
Old October 17th 05, 10:41 AM
Katherine
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dorset crosswheel button instructions

They remind me of dream catchers, in concept at least.

Katherine

spinninglilac wrote:
You will need time on your hands if you try them out Katherine, They
can be fiddly when you start to do them, As I rarely use them as
buttons but for decorations I use any size ring..lol Wool Silk
whatever..Cheers....Cher

"Katherine" wrote in message
...
That is really interesting. I wish I had more time! I have saved
these instructions and the page you sent earlier, and maybe I'll get
to try them next year.

Katherine

spinninglilac wrote:
Found this on the net if anyone is interested and wants to try it
out. This says to make them with Linen thread, but we make them out
of yarn, adding beads to the spokes etc..Bit of history then how to
do them...Cheers...Cher

Here is a variation in the directions:
From The Lady's Guide to Plain Sewing, Book II:

The buttons usually used for shirts and personal linen were thread
buttons. A well organized cottage industry, begun in 1622, in
Dorset, England, gave rise to the name of numerous styles,
including the Dorset Crosswheel. First bone discs then metal rings
were used to make many of the buttons. They should be made without
a break in the ring, such as those used for Roman shades and
curtains. Those of 3/8 inch inside diameter are a good size.

To make a dorset crosswheel button, a linen thread of 40/2 or a
similar size, usually bleached, is used to stitch the buttons. You
will need a piece at least two yards long for each button.

The first step is called casting: using a small, blunt needle, make
buttonhole stitches all around the ring, spacing the stitches very
closely, and completely covering the ring. The knots, or pearls, of
the stitches, will lay to the outside of the ring.

The second step is called slicking: twist the buttonhole stitches
around the ring, so that the knots, or pearls, are on the inside of
the ring. Use the needle to catch some of the pearls, and begin the
twisting with a lever like action. After the twisting is started, it
is usually quite easy to finish the slicking with the fingers.

The third step is called laying: holding the ring firmly with the
fingers of one hand, and the thread pulled taunt by the other, wrap
the thread around the ring, making "spokes". Usually, tweleve spokes
are made. With your imagination, divide the ring like the numbers on
a clock. The thread must be held taunt to prevent the spokes from
loosening and falling off the ring. The centers will not cross
exactly at this stage. Complete this step by securing the threads to
the center with a couple of crosses stitches, catching all of the
spokes. The first crossd stitches can be adjusted to the center
using the needle to push the stitches. Cross the centers again.
Check to be sure the crossed stitches are in the middle of the
ring. This is very important!

The fourth step is called rounding: using the needle, weave around
from spoke to spoke, taking a stitch under and back over each spoke
(like a backstitch). Work from the center outward, fillin in the
ring as closely as possible. Keeo your work even and neat.

Finish the button by using a sharp needle to run the remaining
thread tail through the back of the rounding and exit at the center
back of the button. The tail may be left to use to set on the
button, or may be trimmed off.

End text.



  #7  
Old October 17th 05, 06:34 PM
spinninglilac
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dorset crosswheel button instructions

Yes I think they do me a little bit, but the structure of the spokes are
alot stronger than the thin cotton threads used to make the net of the
d/catcher..

Cheers....Cher


"Katherine" wrote in message
...
They remind me of dream catchers, in concept at least.

Katherine

spinninglilac wrote:
You will need time on your hands if you try them out Katherine, They
can be fiddly when you start to do them, As I rarely use them as
buttons but for decorations I use any size ring..lol Wool Silk
whatever..Cheers....Cher

"Katherine" wrote in message
...
That is really interesting. I wish I had more time! I have saved
these instructions and the page you sent earlier, and maybe I'll get
to try them next year.

Katherine

spinninglilac wrote:
Found this on the net if anyone is interested and wants to try it
out. This says to make them with Linen thread, but we make them out
of yarn, adding beads to the spokes etc..Bit of history then how to
do them...Cheers...Cher

Here is a variation in the directions:
From The Lady's Guide to Plain Sewing, Book II:

The buttons usually used for shirts and personal linen were thread
buttons. A well organized cottage industry, begun in 1622, in
Dorset, England, gave rise to the name of numerous styles,
including the Dorset Crosswheel. First bone discs then metal rings
were used to make many of the buttons. They should be made without
a break in the ring, such as those used for Roman shades and
curtains. Those of 3/8 inch inside diameter are a good size.

To make a dorset crosswheel button, a linen thread of 40/2 or a
similar size, usually bleached, is used to stitch the buttons. You
will need a piece at least two yards long for each button.

The first step is called casting: using a small, blunt needle, make
buttonhole stitches all around the ring, spacing the stitches very
closely, and completely covering the ring. The knots, or pearls, of
the stitches, will lay to the outside of the ring.

The second step is called slicking: twist the buttonhole stitches
around the ring, so that the knots, or pearls, are on the inside of
the ring. Use the needle to catch some of the pearls, and begin the
twisting with a lever like action. After the twisting is started, it
is usually quite easy to finish the slicking with the fingers.

The third step is called laying: holding the ring firmly with the
fingers of one hand, and the thread pulled taunt by the other, wrap
the thread around the ring, making "spokes". Usually, tweleve spokes
are made. With your imagination, divide the ring like the numbers on
a clock. The thread must be held taunt to prevent the spokes from
loosening and falling off the ring. The centers will not cross
exactly at this stage. Complete this step by securing the threads to
the center with a couple of crosses stitches, catching all of the
spokes. The first crossd stitches can be adjusted to the center
using the needle to push the stitches. Cross the centers again.
Check to be sure the crossed stitches are in the middle of the
ring. This is very important!

The fourth step is called rounding: using the needle, weave around
from spoke to spoke, taking a stitch under and back over each spoke
(like a backstitch). Work from the center outward, fillin in the
ring as closely as possible. Keeo your work even and neat.

Finish the button by using a sharp needle to run the remaining
thread tail through the back of the rounding and exit at the center
back of the button. The tail may be left to use to set on the
button, or may be trimmed off.

End text.





  #8  
Old October 17th 05, 07:22 PM
Susie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cher, thanks I received the booklet:

Cher,
Thank you so very much for the Learn to Knit booklet.
Strange though, there was no little tool that you spoke of.
I am reading it now.
Thanks again,
Susie


  #9  
Old October 17th 05, 09:15 PM
spinninglilac
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cher, thanks I received the booklet:

Somewhere on the card I said I couldn't locate the tool, but will keep
trying....lol We had a clear up here over the last couple of months, taking
all my books and tins upstairs to my workroom...I've looked where I was
absolutely sure they were, but they weren't....but as soon as I locate it I
will send it to you...sorry you didn't get it in this package, but I wanted
you to have the booklet more than anything and not wait til I found the
tool. It's only a little latch hook thingy used for picking up stitches on
machine knitting, but they work really well for hand knitting as well, and I
have quite a number of them..

So you will get one. Gem must be receiving her present soon then as this
was sent at the same time.#

Enjoy you booklet......hugz....Cher


"Susie" wrote in message
...
Cher,
Thank you so very much for the Learn to Knit booklet.
Strange though, there was no little tool that you spoke of.
I am reading it now.
Thanks again,
Susie




  #10  
Old October 17th 05, 09:22 PM
Susie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cher, thanks I received the booklet:

Cher,
Oh gosh, I read that sentence and thought it said something about you
couldn't find the book but it says hook........lol.
That's ok. Don't worry about it. I got a crochet hook for 'trying' to
fix stuff and might get a few smaller sizes.
I have another class tomorrow. I bet she suggests a sweater all ready.
OH NO. LOL.
Thanks again,
Susie

Somewhere on the card I said I couldn't locate the tool, but will keep
trying....lol .........................
Enjoy you booklet......hugz....Cher



 




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