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handquilting equipment



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 11th 06, 11:33 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Hanne Gottliebsen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 336
Default handquilting equipment

So, having tried my hand at handpiecing (going quite well, if I say so
myself), I'm now thinking more seriously about learning handquilting too.

Where I live there aren't many classes etc, but so far I've learnt from
books, web, you guys etc more than from classes.

Regardless, I need to get some stuff, right? For space and financial
reasons, a hoop seems like a good place to start for me, and I've found
some that look nice that I can easily get when visiting my parents in a
months time. I was thinking to just get the hoop, this guy also does
floor stands and gizmos that attaches the hoop to the table. If needed I
could get one of those later?

But do I need some sort of stand to even get started? And if not, then
how do you balance everything (hoop and using both hands for quilting).

And what about a thimble? I use a nimble thimble for hand stitching, but
I gather that is not suitable for quilting (no little holes for the
needle to sit in).


Hanne in London
PS. The handpieced 9-patches have generally straight seams, but the eye
balling of 1/4" is still work in progress. But as someone kindly said
last week, it is easier to fudge than when machine piecing :-)
Ads
  #2  
Old October 11th 06, 12:27 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Valerie in FL
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 67
Default handquilting equipment

I have handquilted both with and without a stand, and I think the stand is
better. I find it almost impossible to hold a hoop steady without a stand. I
use a Grace Hoop 2 floor stand with a 14" square hoop. I have a 24" hoop
that came with the stand, but I found that 24" was too big to be able to
quilt in just one direction, as I prefer to do, so I use the smaller hoop
(which came with the Grace lap stand). Both the floor and the lap stand
allow me to rotate the hoop as needed. Both were a bit pricey, but they will
last forever, so that actually makes them a bargain, right? There are
cheaper hoops and stands out there that I'm sure work just fine. I know
there are people out there who handquilt without a stand, and even without a
hoop, but I can't imagine doing that myself.

My first thimble was the Nimble Thimble. I liked using it for handquilting,
because it was comfortable, and I found it held the needle just fine, but it
didn't last long at all, and I never found another one that fit right. I
prefer to manipulate the needle with the side of my middle finger rather
than from the end, so I am currently using a ring-type silver thimble I
bought from TJ Lane. I am considering trying the less-expensive plastic
thimble that the Thimble Lady is now selling. She uses a technique you may
want to try; she has a video clip on her website,
www.thimblelady.com/demo-video.html, if you want to take a look. NAYY.

Valerie in FL
My quilts: http://community.webshots.com/user/vjkahler


"Hanne Gottliebsen" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
So, having tried my hand at handpiecing (going quite well, if I say so
myself), I'm now thinking more seriously about learning handquilting too.

Where I live there aren't many classes etc, but so far I've learnt from
books, web, you guys etc more than from classes.

Regardless, I need to get some stuff, right? For space and financial
reasons, a hoop seems like a good place to start for me, and I've found
some that look nice that I can easily get when visiting my parents in a
months time. I was thinking to just get the hoop, this guy also does floor
stands and gizmos that attaches the hoop to the table. If needed I could
get one of those later?

But do I need some sort of stand to even get started? And if not, then how
do you balance everything (hoop and using both hands for quilting).

And what about a thimble? I use a nimble thimble for hand stitching, but I
gather that is not suitable for quilting (no little holes for the needle
to sit in).


Hanne in London
PS. The handpieced 9-patches have generally straight seams, but the eye
balling of 1/4" is still work in progress. But as someone kindly said last
week, it is easier to fudge than when machine piecing :-)



  #3  
Old October 11th 06, 01:51 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Maureen Wozniak
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,090
Default handquilting equipment

On Wed, 11 Oct 2006 05:33:38 -0500, Hanne Gottliebsen wrote
(in article [email protected]):

So, having tried my hand at handpiecing (going quite well, if I say so
myself), I'm now thinking more seriously about learning handquilting too.

Where I live there aren't many classes etc, but so far I've learnt from
books, web, you guys etc more than from classes.

Regardless, I need to get some stuff, right? For space and financial
reasons, a hoop seems like a good place to start for me, and I've found
some that look nice that I can easily get when visiting my parents in a
months time. I was thinking to just get the hoop, this guy also does
floor stands and gizmos that attaches the hoop to the table. If needed I
could get one of those later?

But do I need some sort of stand to even get started? And if not, then
how do you balance everything (hoop and using both hands for quilting).

And what about a thimble? I use a nimble thimble for hand stitching, but
I gather that is not suitable for quilting (no little holes for the
needle to sit in).


Hanne in London
PS. The handpieced 9-patches have generally straight seams, but the eye
balling of 1/4" is still work in progress. But as someone kindly said
last week, it is easier to fudge than when machine piecing :-)


Hanne, quilt university is offering a handquilting class in a couple of
weeks. Even if you don't sign up for the class there is a good supply list
there.

Maureen

  #4  
Old October 11th 06, 02:01 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
AuntK
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 421
Default handquilting equipment

While a far cry from being an expert I hand quilt as well. I do use a
hoop but just let it and the balance of the quilt rest in my lap. I
can only quilt in one direction and use a thimble on my upper
(quilting) hand. Like others, can't get used to a thimble or any other
device for that matter on my bottom hand and thus, just walk around
with very sore fingers when I'm quilting. I've managed to be
reasonably successful (at least I think so) without spending gobs of $$
on supplies. Having said that, there are just sooo many neat gadgets
out there just begging to be bought and tried!

As to eyeballing the 1/4" - why not mark it? Realizing that takes a
fair amount of time but it may be worth it. My friend who first
interested me in quilting was a hand sewer. Said she couldn't get used
to using a machine. It always amazed me how well she sewed by hand
because mine was so poor. She then showed me the templates she was
using for that particular quilt. 1/4 wide 'rings' of the appropriate
shape. She traced the outside for cutting and the inside for sewing.
She's much more comfortable with a machine now but like me, enjoys the
hand quilting process.

Good luck!

Kim

Hanne Gottliebsen wrote:
So, having tried my hand at handpiecing (going quite well, if I say so
myself), I'm now thinking more seriously about learning handquilting too.

Where I live there aren't many classes etc, but so far I've learnt from
books, web, you guys etc more than from classes.

Regardless, I need to get some stuff, right? For space and financial
reasons, a hoop seems like a good place to start for me, and I've found
some that look nice that I can easily get when visiting my parents in a
months time. I was thinking to just get the hoop, this guy also does
floor stands and gizmos that attaches the hoop to the table. If needed I
could get one of those later?

But do I need some sort of stand to even get started? And if not, then
how do you balance everything (hoop and using both hands for quilting).

And what about a thimble? I use a nimble thimble for hand stitching, but
I gather that is not suitable for quilting (no little holes for the
needle to sit in).


Hanne in London
PS. The handpieced 9-patches have generally straight seams, but the eye
balling of 1/4" is still work in progress. But as someone kindly said
last week, it is easier to fudge than when machine piecing :-)


  #5  
Old October 11th 06, 03:14 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Mary
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 728
Default handquilting equipment

I do 100% of my quilting by hand, and I imagine I break some of the
"rules", but I get rather spectacular results. First, I make my own
templates using plastic sheets with 1/4" grid marks. And rather than
make templates to draw around, I make the plastic sheets into stencils,
so I can drag my pencil in the inside of the holes -- much easier!
Also, I cut the stencil holes the size of the finished pieces, so I am
actually marking seam lines and not cutting lines. By placing the
stencil holes 1/2" apart and cutting the fabric between the seam lines,
I have cut pieces marked for stitiching. I have template sheets
covered with 2" squares, template sheets with 1" squares, etc, so I can
mark quite a few pieces at once. And I always save those sheets for
use on later quilts.

When I design a quilt, with a little arithmetic I can very easily
figure how much of each fabric I will need, and add a wee bit more for
errors in cutting, etc.

When I cut the fabric, I already know how many of each piece of each
size and fabric I need, and cut it all at once. Then I lay out all the
little piles of cut and marked pieces of each size and fabric, and then
re-arrange them into little piles of the fabric pieces needed for each
block. Each pile for a block is put into its own envelope (I use
regular mailing envelopes) with the flap tucked in but not sealed.
Being a cheapskate I re-use all those envelopes, and have them numbered
in the corner, so when I'm opening envelope #26, for example, I know I
have already stitched 25. I can take envelopes with me when I travel,
along with my small plastic box of stitching stuff -- threads,
scissors, needles, thimbles, etc -- in a tote bag. As each block is
finished I fold it, slip it back into its envelope, and begin another.


As to the quilting itself, I break a major "rule" by not using a frame
or hoop at all! Instead, when I assemble the quilt 'sandwich' I put in
quite a few pins so I can move the sandwich from the floor to the
dining room table (which is very carefully covered with pads, table
cloth, and finally a plastic picnic-style cloth or shower curtain
liner). Then, beginning at the center and working out, I baste rather
closely (stitches about 1"), using up a lot of leftover or junky
thread. A closely-basted sandwich doesn't shift, so I simply
lap-quilt, which I find comfortable, convenient, and conducive to the
very tiny stitches I use. Since I don't drag the quilt around a lot or
let people manhandle it I don't need to baste a scrap binding on it,
although if I were planning to take it on a trip to my niece's house
with both toddlers and dogs I probably would.

Once I was working on some whole cloth quilting while covering phones
at the church office, and it was the day the quilters came in to work
on the current quilt at the church. A couple of the very old, very
opinionated, very excellent quilters stopped by the office, saw what I
was doing, and very firmly told me it was simply NOT RIGHT and that to
quilt without a hoop or frame was sure to get horrible results. I
flipped the piece over (it was a Christmas tree skirt) to show them,
and they were very impressed, apologised for being critical, and told
me to keep on doing what I was doing because it was excellent.
However, they did tell me that I really need to learn to do fine
stitching with a frame so I could join a proper quilting group, and
offered to teach me to quilt properly with a frame so I could join them
every Tuesday afternoon. These ladies have a lot to teach, and I have
a lot to learn, so I am planning to join them.

Anyhow, the bottom line is to do what you enjoy and get good results
with, and don't worry too much about the "rules", because there are,
after all, no Quilt Police!


Hanne Gottliebsen wrote:
So, having tried my hand at handpiecing (going quite well, if I say so
myself), I'm now thinking more seriously about learning handquilting too.

Where I live there aren't many classes etc, but so far I've learnt from
books, web, you guys etc more than from classes.

Regardless, I need to get some stuff, right? For space and financial
reasons, a hoop seems like a good place to start for me, and I've found
some that look nice that I can easily get when visiting my parents in a
months time. I was thinking to just get the hoop, this guy also does
floor stands and gizmos that attaches the hoop to the table. If needed I
could get one of those later?

But do I need some sort of stand to even get started? And if not, then
how do you balance everything (hoop and using both hands for quilting).

And what about a thimble? I use a nimble thimble for hand stitching, but
I gather that is not suitable for quilting (no little holes for the
needle to sit in).


Hanne in London
PS. The handpieced 9-patches have generally straight seams, but the eye
balling of 1/4" is still work in progress. But as someone kindly said
last week, it is easier to fudge than when machine piecing :-)


  #6  
Old October 11th 06, 03:18 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Taria
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 432
Default handquilting equipment

I have the Grace HOop 2 also. It really has worked out well for me.
I do have an oval carry around hoop that is about 14" oval that is
really handy. I had to buy one of the smaller hoops for my floor stand
too. I really think the large one that came originally with mine was
too cumbersome to work well for me. The day the hoop came in the mail
DH made the comment that it must have cost $100. I said at least and
he was sure he didn't want to know any more.
I have a favorite sterling thimble that I found in an old sewing
machine drawer years ago. The whole sewing machine was worth the cost
of that wonderful thimble. I'd try the Thimble Lady stuff if I wasn't
so cheap.
Taria


Valerie in FL wrote:
I have handquilted both with and without a stand, and I think the stand is
better. I find it almost impossible to hold a hoop steady without a stand. I
use a Grace Hoop 2 floor stand with a 14" square hoop. I have a 24" hoop
that came with the stand, but I found that 24" was too big to be able to
quilt in just one direction, as I prefer to do, so I use the smaller hoop
(which came with the Grace lap stand). Both the floor and the lap stand
allow me to rotate the hoop as needed. Both were a bit pricey, but they will
last forever, so that actually makes them a bargain, right? There are
cheaper hoops and stands out there that I'm sure work just fine. I know
there are people out there who handquilt without a stand, and even without a
hoop, but I can't imagine doing that myself.

My first thimble was the Nimble Thimble. I liked using it for handquilting,
because it was comfortable, and I found it held the needle just fine, but it
didn't last long at all, and I never found another one that fit right. I
prefer to manipulate the needle with the side of my middle finger rather
than from the end, so I am currently using a ring-type silver thimble I
bought from TJ Lane. I am considering trying the less-expensive plastic
thimble that the Thimble Lady is now selling. She uses a technique you may
want to try; she has a video clip on her website,
www.thimblelady.com/demo-video.html, if you want to take a look. NAYY.

Valerie in FL
My quilts: http://community.webshots.com/user/vjkahler




  #7  
Old October 11th 06, 03:23 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Taria
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 432
Default handquilting equipment

I'm pretty impressed with your system Mary. I like the idea
of the blocks in numbered envelopes.
The quilt ladies sound like a fun thing.
Taria


Mary wrote:

I do 100% of my quilting by hand, and I imagine I break some of the
"rules", but I get rather spectacular results. First, I make my own
templates using plastic sheets with 1/4" grid marks. And rather than
make templates to draw around, I make the plastic sheets into stencils,
so I can drag my pencil in the inside of the holes -- much easier!
Also, I cut the stencil holes the size of the finished pieces, so I am
actually marking seam lines and not cutting lines. By placing the
stencil holes 1/2" apart and cutting the fabric between the seam lines,
I have cut pieces marked for stitiching. I have template sheets
covered with 2" squares, template sheets with 1" squares, etc, so I can
mark quite a few pieces at once. And I always save those sheets for
use on later quilts.

When I design a quilt, with a little arithmetic I can very easily
figure how much of each fabric I will need, and add a wee bit more for
errors in cutting, etc.

When I cut the fabric, I already know how many of each piece of each
size and fabric I need, and cut it all at once. Then I lay out all the
little piles of cut and marked pieces of each size and fabric, and then
re-arrange them into little piles of the fabric pieces needed for each
block. Each pile for a block is put into its own envelope (I use
regular mailing envelopes) with the flap tucked in but not sealed.
Being a cheapskate I re-use all those envelopes, and have them numbered
in the corner, so when I'm opening envelope #26, for example, I know I
have already stitched 25. I can take envelopes with me when I travel,
along with my small plastic box of stitching stuff -- threads,
scissors, needles, thimbles, etc -- in a tote bag. As each block is
finished I fold it, slip it back into its envelope, and begin another.


As to the quilting itself, I break a major "rule" by not using a frame
or hoop at all! Instead, when I assemble the quilt 'sandwich' I put in
quite a few pins so I can move the sandwich from the floor to the
dining room table (which is very carefully covered with pads, table
cloth, and finally a plastic picnic-style cloth or shower curtain
liner). Then, beginning at the center and working out, I baste rather
closely (stitches about 1"), using up a lot of leftover or junky
thread. A closely-basted sandwich doesn't shift, so I simply
lap-quilt, which I find comfortable, convenient, and conducive to the
very tiny stitches I use. Since I don't drag the quilt around a lot or
let people manhandle it I don't need to baste a scrap binding on it,
although if I were planning to take it on a trip to my niece's house
with both toddlers and dogs I probably would.

Once I was working on some whole cloth quilting while covering phones
at the church office, and it was the day the quilters came in to work
on the current quilt at the church. A couple of the very old, very
opinionated, very excellent quilters stopped by the office, saw what I
was doing, and very firmly told me it was simply NOT RIGHT and that to
quilt without a hoop or frame was sure to get horrible results. I
flipped the piece over (it was a Christmas tree skirt) to show them,
and they were very impressed, apologised for being critical, and told
me to keep on doing what I was doing because it was excellent.
However, they did tell me that I really need to learn to do fine
stitching with a frame so I could join a proper quilting group, and
offered to teach me to quilt properly with a frame so I could join them
every Tuesday afternoon. These ladies have a lot to teach, and I have
a lot to learn, so I am planning to join them.

Anyhow, the bottom line is to do what you enjoy and get good results
with, and don't worry too much about the "rules", because there are,
after all, no Quilt Police!


  #8  
Old October 11th 06, 04:54 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Sandy Ellison Sandy Ellison is offline
Banned
 
First recorded activity by CraftBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,002
Default handquilting equipment

Howdy!

Wow! What a fun subject to find on this group, first thing in the morning:
handquilting! ;-D

Tools: I love the 12" hoops, thick ones w/ a good, sturdy screw to tighten
the hoop; no floor stand, no floor frame any more.
A variety of needles helps, as does checking out a few thimbles to see
what's comfortable. Good thread made for handquilting, like the
Gutermann & the good ol' Coats & Clark brands, are faves for hand quilting
as well as hand piecing. I like the scissor straps that hang around the
neck to keep a small pair of (embroidery) scissors close at hand,
like these stork scissors which are sharp and have a nice feel to them,
and a basket to keep everything beside me (also holds a few chocolates
&/or mints &/or chewing gum). I keep several packages of finger cots
in the notions drawers (pyramid cabinet by the front door g), a special
treat for grasping & pulling those needles thru' the layers; cheap item,
must have it in my sewing bags.
And that's it, the only handquilting equipment I *need*.

My best tools stay in a small cosmetic bag (snaps or zips shut) in the
open sewing basket; a second set is packed in another bag, ready to go
when I do, containing my not-so-favorite thimbles and 2nd or 3rd best
small scissors, thread, extra needles & finger cots, marking pen, spare
change, a couple of buttons, address labels & tiny note pad.
For airplane rides I have a small pill bottle stuffed
w/ needles and finger cots, wrapped in masking tape (makes a great guide
for marking straight lines &/or seam allowances), also holds safety pins
removed from the basted quilt; this goes into a ziplock-type bag
w/ thread & a plastic letter opener that has a tiny sharp metal edge in it
for cutting thread, along w/ a pen & a tiny note pad; this all packs into a
larger ziplock bag containing the small take-along quilting project.

Newest favorite thimble: open-ended Clover metal
http://www.shopatron.com/product/pro...=CLV6017/181.0
(I didn't pay that much!); my fingers aren't tapered to a point as
so many thimbles are. A variety of thimbles is a good thing. g

If a nimble thimble works for you, Hanne, go with it. This should
be fun and comfortable; handquilting is addictive. ;-)
http://tinyurl.com/jxm2k

Cheers and good luck!

Ragmop/Sandy-- http://tinyurl.com/ly7ld


On 10/11/06 5:33 AM, in article [email protected], "Hanne Gottliebsen"
wrote:

So, having tried my hand at handpiecing (going quite well, if I say so
myself), I'm now thinking more seriously about learning handquilting too.

Where I live there aren't many classes etc, but so far I've learnt from
books, web, you guys etc more than from classes.

Regardless, I need to get some stuff, right? For space and financial
reasons, a hoop seems like a good place to start for me, and I've found
some that look nice that I can easily get when visiting my parents in a
months time. I was thinking to just get the hoop, this guy also does
floor stands and gizmos that attaches the hoop to the table. If needed I
could get one of those later?

But do I need some sort of stand to even get started? And if not, then
how do you balance everything (hoop and using both hands for quilting).

And what about a thimble? I use a nimble thimble for hand stitching, but
I gather that is not suitable for quilting (no little holes for the
needle to sit in).


Hanne in London
PS. The handpieced 9-patches have generally straight seams, but the eye
balling of 1/4" is still work in progress. But as someone kindly said
last week, it is easier to fudge than when machine piecing :-)


  #9  
Old October 11th 06, 05:22 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Sandy Foster
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 926
Default handquilting equipment

In article [email protected], Hanne Gottliebsen
wrote:

Regardless, I need to get some stuff, right? For space and financial
reasons, a hoop seems like a good place to start for me, and I've found
some that look nice that I can easily get when visiting my parents in a
months time. I was thinking to just get the hoop, this guy also does
floor stands and gizmos that attaches the hoop to the table. If needed I
could get one of those later?


Hanne, I'd recommend measuring your arm from your inner elbow to your
palm. Don't get a hoop any larger than twice that measurement (in
diameter, I mean), because it will otherwise be difficult to reach the
center of the hoop.


But do I need some sort of stand to even get started? And if not, then
how do you balance everything (hoop and using both hands for quilting).


If you can swing it, I'd go ahead and get the floor stand at the same
time as the hoop. You never know whether it will still be available
later, and it definitely makes the quilting easier, IMHO. You can, of
course, balance the hoop on your leg or a table or chair, but a stand is
much easier and lets the hoop swivel. However, I'd skip getting any
little attachment for doing the edges; I've been disappointed in the
ones I've tried and found that making a "hoop cap" (from instructions I
found in an old issue of QNM and saved) worked much better.


And what about a thimble? I use a nimble thimble for hand stitching, but
I gather that is not suitable for quilting (no little holes for the
needle to sit in).



A thimble is very personal. Do you push with the top of your finger or
with the pad? I push with the pad, and my fingers tend to get hot (look
where I live! G), so a "topless" thimble (aka tailor's thimble) works
very well for me. Buy the least expensive one you can find until you're
sure of the style you prefer; then you can invest, if you like (or not!
G) in a nice one -- sterling tends to expand/contract with your finger
according to the weather, so that's a great excuse for spending a bit
more. LOL! HTH!
--
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
my ISP is earthlink.net -- put sfoster1(at) in front
http://home.earthlink.net/~sfoster1

AKA Dame Sandy, Minister of Education
  #10  
Old October 11th 06, 06:46 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Debra
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,520
Default handquilting equipment

On Wed, 11 Oct 2006 11:33:38 +0100, Hanne Gottliebsen
wrote:

So, having tried my hand at handpiecing (going quite well, if I say so
myself), I'm now thinking more seriously about learning handquilting too.

Where I live there aren't many classes etc, but so far I've learnt from
books, web, you guys etc more than from classes.

Regardless, I need to get some stuff, right? For space and financial
reasons, a hoop seems like a good place to start for me, and I've found
some that look nice that I can easily get when visiting my parents in a
months time. I was thinking to just get the hoop, this guy also does
floor stands and gizmos that attaches the hoop to the table. If needed I
could get one of those later?

But do I need some sort of stand to even get started? And if not, then
how do you balance everything (hoop and using both hands for quilting).

And what about a thimble? I use a nimble thimble for hand stitching, but
I gather that is not suitable for quilting (no little holes for the
needle to sit in).


Hanne in London


For just trying out hand quilting for the first time Mom suggested
that I spend as little money as possible on hand quilting gizmos until
I had decided if I enjoyed the process. I thread basted my little
quilt. I used a large (12 or 14 inch) wooden embroidery hoop that I
already had in my house, although I could have borrowed a heavier
quilting hoop from my mom. I did some of the work using the hoop, and
some of the work using no hoop at all to see which method I preferred.
I've never had a stand for needlework so I was already familiar with
propping the hoop on chair arms and various body parts so I had no
problems doing the same with a quilt. I did not use a thimble at all,
but if you already use one, use the one you like until you know if you
need a different type. I drew quilting lines on my quilt with a chalk
pencil as I moved the hoop from section to section.

From my first attempt at hand quilting I learned I enjoy hand
quilting, I prefer using a hoop, and that I needed a thimble that I
could push the needle with the side of my finger. I now have a
thimble that will work that way. I don't think I would like a hoop
stand at all because my hand quilting project would be less portable
if I had to carry a stand around with me.

So Hanne, basically you need needle, thread, a chalk pencil or other
line marker, your favorite thimble, and a hoop. Everything else can
be bought if you decide you love hand quilting.
Debra in VA
See my quilts at
http://community.webshots.com/user/debplayshere
 




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