A crafts forum. CraftBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » CraftBanter forum » Craft related newsgroups » Pottery
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

digital ceramic decal



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old August 14th 03, 01:09 PM
chan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default digital ceramic decal

Any one have any thing about digital decal produced by laser printers?
I was told that the toner can be printed from a laser printer to decal and
transfer to ceramic surface and fire onglaze color.

k.t.chan
---
Posted via news://freenews.netfront.net
Complaints to
Ads
  #2  
Old August 15th 03, 03:51 PM
Jake Loddington
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , chan
writes
Any one have any thing about digital decal produced by laser printers?
I was told that the toner can be printed from a laser printer to decal and
transfer to ceramic surface and fire onglaze color.

k.t.chan


I suggest you try to get hold of a copy of a book called 'Ceramics and
Print' by Paul Scott, published by A.& C. Black of London UK. It *must*
be the second edition: the first edition wasn't very helpful for your
problem. The ISBN is 0 7136 5485 6 .

I assume that you're talking about using a monochrome laser? I've tried
this, and the trouble is that the usual toners (Epson, HP, etc.) fire
out at stoneware temperatures. There may be a slight sepia image left,
but this tends to disappear when it's glazed.

My method was to cheat the printer by switching off just before the
printed page reached the fuser. Then the image, of unfused toner, could
be transferred to a damp clay surface by gentle rubbing.

The nearest I got to satisfactory results was to use a somewhat
different method. I produced a properly fused image, and then used this
as a sort of litho plate, relying on the fact that the image repels
water but the background paper doesn't. I could then ink it with an oily
medium containing the ceramic stain or oxide, and then *gently* wash off
the surplus. If you're old enough to know about a photographic technique
called underwater bromoil, it's like that.

But despite all my efforts, I never produced anything which really
satisfied me!

I would very much like to know of an idiot-proof (and inexpensive) way
of transferring text images, preferably underglaze, to a ceramic
surface. Ordering custom-made decals is an expensive business when you
need only one-offs.

Jake Loddington, POULTON-LE-FYLDE, Lancs. UK

  #3  
Old August 15th 03, 05:22 PM
chan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi Jake

I was told that the toner is actually real glaze with color and resin to
make it like toner, and transfer to decal with nomal laser printer like
Canon clc900.
I was in the trade of inkjet dye-sub transfer to ceramic, but only to the
coating of polyetster, not a real glaze.
Decal water transfer paper to ceramic is a mature technology. Buying ready
made decal for ceramic will not be difficult. But thay are all ready made
images or pictures printed by screen printing to decal paper in large
volume.
The price to make screens are expensive. What I am looking is laser print
with special toner to decal paper in a very small quanlity or even a single
print only.
Did you try decal transfer to ceramic and fire in 800 deg C.

The toner is used by http://www.urbanclay.com to produce pictures.
Are they working?

Regards

K.T.Chan


Jake Loddington wrote in
:

In article , chan
writes
Any one have any thing about digital decal produced by laser printers?
I was told that the toner can be printed from a laser printer to decal
and transfer to ceramic surface and fire onglaze color.

k.t.chan


I suggest you try to get hold of a copy of a book called 'Ceramics and
Print' by Paul Scott, published by A.& C. Black of London UK. It
*must* be the second edition: the first edition wasn't very helpful
for your problem. The ISBN is 0 7136 5485 6 .

I assume that you're talking about using a monochrome laser? I've
tried this, and the trouble is that the usual toners (Epson, HP, etc.)
fire out at stoneware temperatures. There may be a slight sepia image
left, but this tends to disappear when it's glazed.

My method was to cheat the printer by switching off just before the
printed page reached the fuser. Then the image, of unfused toner,
could be transferred to a damp clay surface by gentle rubbing.

The nearest I got to satisfactory results was to use a somewhat
different method. I produced a properly fused image, and then used
this as a sort of litho plate, relying on the fact that the image
repels water but the background paper doesn't. I could then ink it
with an oily medium containing the ceramic stain or oxide, and then
*gently* wash off the surplus. If you're old enough to know about a
photographic technique called underwater bromoil, it's like that.

But despite all my efforts, I never produced anything which really
satisfied me!

I would very much like to know of an idiot-proof (and inexpensive) way
of transferring text images, preferably underglaze, to a ceramic
surface. Ordering custom-made decals is an expensive business when you
need only one-offs.

Jake Loddington, POULTON-LE-FYLDE, Lancs. UK



---
Posted via news://freenews.netfront.net
Complaints to
  #4  
Old August 15th 03, 06:30 PM
Bob Masta
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 16:22:59 +0000 (UTC), chan wrote:

Hi Jake

I was told that the toner is actually real glaze with color and resin to
make it like toner, and transfer to decal with nomal laser printer like
Canon clc900.


Laser toner always has a lot of magnetic iron oxide in it, since
laser printers (and xerographic copiers) use a magnetic method
to distribute the toner on the drum. Toner makers sell "special"
versions for printing the magnetic text on checks, but as far as
I can tell that's mostly a scam... almost any toner would work as
well.

The problem as I see it is that if you want more iron that what
the printer gives, there's no easy way to get it extra-thick.
(I suppose you could try feeding the same sheet through
again, but I have my doubts...!)

Might be fun to run a few experiments.



Bob Masta
dqatechATdaqartaDOTcom

D A Q A R T A
Data AcQuisition And Real-Time Analysis
Shareware from Interstellar Research
www.daqarta.com
  #6  
Old August 16th 03, 05:48 PM
Sam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Lots of info in that web site(urbanclay). Firing temp would be handy to
know. I notice it says dishwasher proof, does that mean it can be cooked on
or not.?

Sam

"chan" wrote in message
...
Hi Jake

I was told that the toner is actually real glaze with color and resin to
make it like toner, and transfer to decal with nomal laser printer like
Canon clc900.
I was in the trade of inkjet dye-sub transfer to ceramic, but only to the
coating of polyetster, not a real glaze.
Decal water transfer paper to ceramic is a mature technology. Buying ready
made decal for ceramic will not be difficult. But thay are all ready made
images or pictures printed by screen printing to decal paper in large
volume.
The price to make screens are expensive. What I am looking is laser print
with special toner to decal paper in a very small quanlity or even a

single
print only.
Did you try decal transfer to ceramic and fire in 800 deg C.

The toner is used by http://www.urbanclay.com to produce pictures.
Are they working?

Regards

K.T.Chan


Jake Loddington wrote in
:

In article , chan
writes
Any one have any thing about digital decal produced by laser printers?
I was told that the toner can be printed from a laser printer to decal
and transfer to ceramic surface and fire onglaze color.

k.t.chan


I suggest you try to get hold of a copy of a book called 'Ceramics and
Print' by Paul Scott, published by A.& C. Black of London UK. It
*must* be the second edition: the first edition wasn't very helpful
for your problem. The ISBN is 0 7136 5485 6 .

I assume that you're talking about using a monochrome laser? I've
tried this, and the trouble is that the usual toners (Epson, HP, etc.)
fire out at stoneware temperatures. There may be a slight sepia image
left, but this tends to disappear when it's glazed.

My method was to cheat the printer by switching off just before the
printed page reached the fuser. Then the image, of unfused toner,
could be transferred to a damp clay surface by gentle rubbing.

The nearest I got to satisfactory results was to use a somewhat
different method. I produced a properly fused image, and then used
this as a sort of litho plate, relying on the fact that the image
repels water but the background paper doesn't. I could then ink it
with an oily medium containing the ceramic stain or oxide, and then
*gently* wash off the surplus. If you're old enough to know about a
photographic technique called underwater bromoil, it's like that.

But despite all my efforts, I never produced anything which really
satisfied me!

I would very much like to know of an idiot-proof (and inexpensive) way
of transferring text images, preferably underglaze, to a ceramic
surface. Ordering custom-made decals is an expensive business when you
need only one-offs.

Jake Loddington, POULTON-LE-FYLDE, Lancs. UK



---
Posted via news://freenews.netfront.net
Complaints to



  #7  
Old August 18th 03, 01:30 PM
Bob Masta
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 14:25:40 +0100, Jake Loddington
wrote:

I had thought of ball-milling some e.g. cobalt carbonate and then
injecting it into my laser toner cartridge (when nearly empty) and
giving it a good shaking. It's a Star printer; a crib of the HP Laserjet
2.

Anyone tried anything like this?


The laser printer uses a magnet on a spiral screw to distribute toner
over the drum. so it wouldn't pick up any non-magnetic oxides. But
supposing it did (maybe dragged along with residual normal magnetic
toner, or just leaking out), then you would have the issue of what
your cobalt carbonate does to the drum. The drum is an exotic
photo-sensitive material, and you might poison it.

If your printer is the kind where the drum is replaced with the
toner cartridge, this might not be a big deal. On the other hand,
since the added oxide has no plastic in it, it won't fuse to the
paper except by association with normal toner. So the oxide
might be falling off and getting into places it shouldn't.
Seems rather risky, unless you are about to junk the
printer anyway... but I'd love to find out the results
of any experiments you conduct!


Bob Masta
dqatechATdaqartaDOTcom

D A Q A R T A
Data AcQuisition And Real-Time Analysis
Shareware from Interstellar Research
www.daqarta.com
  #8  
Old August 18th 03, 04:25 PM
chan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

There is other kinds of powder transfer printers like laser photocopier.
The Xante copier is using a magnetic drum that has magnetized and
demagnetized spots on the drum surface seted by a magnetic head according
to the picture scanned or from digital files.

The magnetized spot will pick up "starter or developer" that is iron powder
making a brush to pick up toner, a power that attach to the brush.

Ceramic powder that is glaze powder and flux mixed with resin can be pickup
and thansfer to the media paper or decal surface.

The fuser is a heat roller for normal toner resin to melt and stick to the
paper.

That is to make a decal paper with the image.
Thansfer the decal image in 4 colored glaze to the cermaic glaze surface,
kind of onglaze color.
Fire the glaze in 800 deg C that melt the glaze to make color pictures.

Laser copier is moreless the same but the image is set by static charge
partially discharged by laser light.

The decal can be made by silk screen but more expansive. But most comercial
decal transfers are made like that.Of cause you can not request pictures of
your like without paying much money.

The problem is at the moment the powder was developed inside a Canon clc900
printer with a rip for color management. 5000 us to start with, and no
support from the printer manufacturer. Warrenty gone.

Will try with the support of laser copier or Xante friends to see if the
powder can work with some other printer cheaper.

That is what I know from a non pottery people. I am from the inkjet
transfer dye sub printing on ceramic field. Wanted to get deeper into real
glaze and ceramic.

Regards

K.T.Chan
(Bob Masta) wrote in
:

On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 14:25:40 +0100, Jake Loddington
wrote:

I had thought of ball-milling some e.g. cobalt carbonate and then
injecting it into my laser toner cartridge (when nearly empty) and
giving it a good shaking. It's a Star printer; a crib of the HP Laserjet
2.

Anyone tried anything like this?


The laser printer uses a magnet on a spiral screw to distribute toner
over the drum. so it wouldn't pick up any non-magnetic oxides. But
supposing it did (maybe dragged along with residual normal magnetic
toner, or just leaking out), then you would have the issue of what
your cobalt carbonate does to the drum. The drum is an exotic

photo-sensitive material, and you might poison it.

If your printer is the kind where the drum is replaced with the
toner cartridge, this might not be a big deal. On the other hand,
since the added oxide has no plastic in it, it won't fuse to the
paper except by association with normal toner. So the oxide
might be falling off and getting into places it shouldn't.
Seems rather risky, unless you are about to junk the
printer anyway... but I'd love to find out the results
of any experiments you conduct!


Bob Masta
dqatechATdaqartaDOTcom

D A Q A R T A
Data AcQuisition And Real-Time Analysis
Shareware from Interstellar Research
www.daqarta.com

---
Posted via news://freenews.netfront.net
Complaints to
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
AD: Ceramic Beads and Poly Ending Juanita Floyd Beads 0 June 5th 04 05:52 PM
OT ~ Digital camera and/or scanner help needed! Mj Beads 28 April 21st 04 06:55 AM
how to make ceramic beads luis goldfarb Beads 0 December 3rd 03 01:31 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 CraftBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.