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hand glass beveling machines for sale, ten, located florida, USA



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 18th 03, 04:58 AM
bill yohler
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Posts: n/a
Default hand glass beveling machines for sale, ten, located florida, USA

offering for your consideration, viewing and reading pleasure, and
hopefully your hugely generous cash offer are my ten VERY old, VERY
heavy duty _true_ industrial duty hand glass beveling machines. I've
finally reposted my "old" website, with some minor modifications:

http://members.cox.net/machines/

keep this in mind: the machines I'm offering for your offer have
_already_ outlasted your great grandfather, grandfather, and possibly
your father, too. with even a minumum of care, they're gonna easily
outlast you and your childrens childrens children, too. So, how many
'modern' manufacturers can make THAT claim?

These machines are NOT suitable for 'making tabletops' or 'line
beveling strips' or for 'occasional' or 'hobbiest' type endeavors -
they're strictly for making small free-form shapes of beveled glass,
24/7/365....crescent moons, amoeba shapes, free-form shapes of all
description. by the way, these machines are NOT suitable for 'tabletop
use' as they would, normally, flat-out CRUSH any table they were
placed upon....they weigh approx 1000 to 1500 lbs each.

hope all have a merry season, peace,

dave
Ads
  #2  
Old December 18th 03, 02:00 PM
Mike Aurelius
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Posts: n/a
Default

Yeah...we remember you from the last go 'round...I guess that you didn't get
the message that the machines you have will garner more $$ from the scrap
dealer than anyone else. Who's gonna move them klunkers? Where is the power
going to come from to run 'em once they've been moved? Krimenently Bill, get
out the cutting torch and scrap them!

Mike


  #3  
Old December 18th 03, 03:18 PM
Moonraker
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Mike Aurelius" wrote in message
...
Yeah...we remember you from the last go 'round...I guess that you didn't

get
the message that the machines you have will garner more $$ from the scrap
dealer than anyone else. Who's gonna move them klunkers? Where is the

power
going to come from to run 'em once they've been moved? Krimenently Bill,

get
out the cutting torch and scrap them!

Mike



Maybe he's hoping the Smithsonian will contact him?


  #4  
Old December 20th 03, 08:36 PM
bill yohler
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Moonraker" wrote in message ...
"Mike Aurelius" wrote in message
...
Yeah...we remember you from the last go 'round...I guess that you didn't

get
the message that the machines you have will garner more $$ from the scrap
dealer than anyone else.


obviously, mike, folk like you aren't serious bevelers, or even
bevelers at all, for that matter, so, umm, should I care about your
not too bright observations? I'm curious, though: did you buy a
toolbox yet? or are you still fulltime busy 'making fun of' others
efforts?

Who's gonna move them klunkers?


the -serious- buyers will have 'the right stuff' & inclination to
move 'em. others, of lesser brainpower, will continue to childishly
amuse themselves thinking they're "full-blown glass pro's" because
they own a soldering iron...and maybe TWO glasscutters. wowie...

hey mikey - perhaps you've heard of forklifts, hydraulic tailgates,
and intermodal cargo containers? but, then again, maybe not

Where is the
power
going to come from to run 'em once they've been moved?


again, mr. mike, as always, the power will come from the serious
buyers premises. but, uhh, because YOU in your seemingly infinite
wisdom have no clue what three phase is and have no familiarity with
voltages other than 115 single phase doesn't mean the rest of the
earth in as ill-informed as you, happliy. you might not believe this,
but some folks here DO operate out of premises _other_than_ their
homes; meaning: warehouses with industrial electric (uhh, stuff you're
not familiar with).

Krimenently Bill,
get
out the cutting torch and scrap them!


gee, mike, why not consider 'scrapping' your worthless unstudied
observations?


Mike



Maybe he's hoping the Smithsonian will contact him?



hey "mookflaker" sheesh speaking of the smithsonian: did you ever
have any luck building those hand bevelers you wanted to put into a
shoebox under your bed? you guys certainly are quite a pair....which
one of ya's is president of your mutual admiration socity?
  #5  
Old December 20th 03, 08:50 PM
Moonraker
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I got an idea where you can stuff those "machines", asshole.


"bill yohler" wrote in message
om...
"Moonraker" wrote in message

...
"Mike Aurelius" wrote in message
...
Yeah...we remember you from the last go 'round...I guess that you

didn't
get
the message that the machines you have will garner more $$ from the

scrap
dealer than anyone else.


obviously, mike, folk like you aren't serious bevelers, or even
bevelers at all, for that matter, so, umm, should I care about your
not too bright observations? I'm curious, though: did you buy a
toolbox yet? or are you still fulltime busy 'making fun of' others
efforts?

Who's gonna move them klunkers?


the -serious- buyers will have 'the right stuff' & inclination to
move 'em. others, of lesser brainpower, will continue to childishly
amuse themselves thinking they're "full-blown glass pro's" because
they own a soldering iron...and maybe TWO glasscutters. wowie...

hey mikey - perhaps you've heard of forklifts, hydraulic tailgates,
and intermodal cargo containers? but, then again, maybe not

Where is the
power
going to come from to run 'em once they've been moved?


again, mr. mike, as always, the power will come from the serious
buyers premises. but, uhh, because YOU in your seemingly infinite
wisdom have no clue what three phase is and have no familiarity with
voltages other than 115 single phase doesn't mean the rest of the
earth in as ill-informed as you, happliy. you might not believe this,
but some folks here DO operate out of premises _other_than_ their
homes; meaning: warehouses with industrial electric (uhh, stuff you're
not familiar with).

Krimenently Bill,
get
out the cutting torch and scrap them!


gee, mike, why not consider 'scrapping' your worthless unstudied
observations?


Mike



Maybe he's hoping the Smithsonian will contact him?



hey "mookflaker" sheesh speaking of the smithsonian: did you ever
have any luck building those hand bevelers you wanted to put into a
shoebox under your bed? you guys certainly are quite a pair....which
one of ya's is president of your mutual admiration socity?



  #6  
Old December 21st 03, 02:43 AM
Javahut
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"bill yohler" wrote in message
om...
offering for your consideration, viewing and reading pleasure, and


snipped in the interest of bandwidth

hope all have a merry season, peace,

dave


I am a beveller, and I am curious, Dave?

Why put yourself to the grief? Yeah, I know these machines have served you
well, but so did my old 386-25 computer.
The problem you have is that the learning curve needed to make these produce
a good bevel is more than alot of people have in an age of necessary high
production per hour. High speed diamond wheels cut the time on the machine.
Yes, there is some specialty moves that they can't do, but they are not run
into that often.

Here is the kicker, I bevel on equipment such as what you are selling, but
if I were buying today the machines would have to do more inches per hour.
It's just business.

By the way, its not that your machines aren't worth it, there just is not
anyone left with the time and inclination to learn to bevel by hand on that
type of machine. I have a friend trying to sell a Denver 30" set. New it
was $13,000 fob Denver, they are down to $2000 and can't move it.
Same thing you have, rougher, smoother,with good Lombard wheel, incurve
rougher and smoother, cork and fiber wheels with polisher(30").
Are you willing to sell them that low? I doubt it.

By the way, the Smithsonian has a set, as does the Greenfield Village in
Dearborn, and the Center for Creative Studies in Detroit. Bet Wheaton
Village has some too! There isn't anyone left to donate them to either

Offshore and Pacific Rim are heavy into high speed diamond, even they know
its more efficient, nobody does if for the joy and personal satisfaction of
creation.

I bet you knew all this, I just didn't have anything else to do this evening
so I thought I would be the nice guy before saying they are nothing better
than a boat anchor.


  #7  
Old December 21st 03, 05:38 PM
bill yohler
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Javahut" wrote in message ...

Why put yourself to the grief?


no "grief" selling the machines; a post every six months or year or
so, on avg. someday the right guy will come along. till then, I deal
with "peanut gallery" type commentaries

Yeah, I know these machines have served you
well, but so did my old 386-25 computer.


didn't you say they're serving _you_ well, too? thought I heard you
say that...a little further down

The problem you have is that the learning curve needed to make these produce
a good bevel is more than alot of people have in an age of necessary high
production per hour.


unlike you, I can't 'speak to' the learning curve of ALL people on
earth. some of the more adept folks will 'grasp the concept' and
techniques neccessary in minutes, but others never will, with the
majority, I'd guess, falling somewhere in between on the learning bell
curve. but maybe you're better qualified to speak for everyone on the
PLANET than I?

snip
Here is the kicker, I bevel on equipment such as what you are selling, but
if I were buying today the machines would have to do more inches per hour.
It's just business.


each to his own, I always say...the guys I know that bevel still
"swear by" the old machines, and have diamond - wheeled machines in
their shops, too, in some cases.

By the way, its not that your machines aren't worth it, there just is not
anyone left with the time and inclination to learn to bevel by hand on that
type of machine.


here we go with the 'not anyone' sweeping generalizations of speaking
for 'everyone on earth' again - interesting.

I have a friend trying to sell a Denver 30" set. New it
was $13,000 fob Denver, they are down to $2000 and can't move it.
Same thing you have, rougher, smoother,with good Lombard wheel, incurve
rougher and smoother, cork and fiber wheels with polisher(30").
Are you willing to sell them that low? I doubt it.


see my earlier commentaries regarding "quality of machines currently
offered" with too-small bearings, undersized shafts, lightweight steel
frames, too small motors, etc etc. my machines were running about a
century before DGM stuff even existed, and will still be running after
DGM stuff's been melted down and turned to rebar.

By the way, the Smithsonian has a set, as does the Greenfield Village in
Dearborn, and the Center for Creative Studies in Detroit. Bet Wheaton
Village has some too! There isn't anyone left to donate them to either


speaking for 'the entire planet' again? so this means I might not find
a buyer in the next 15 minutes? that's kinda shocking :-/


Offshore and Pacific Rim are heavy into high speed diamond, even they know
its more efficient, nobody does if for the joy and personal satisfaction of
creation.


well, you're _still_ the self-appointed speaker for everyone on the
planet. cool sweeping generalizations. innacurate though they may be.
agreed, though, there aren't 'millions of buyers' waiting, like for
soldering irons and glasscutters, but, hey, that's life. I realize
this is a 'special interest' thing. some guys want dusenbergs, others
just want hyundai's

I bet you knew all this, I just didn't have anything else to do this evening
so I thought I would be the nice guy before saying they are nothing better
than a boat anchor.



you can use yours YOURS for "boat anchors" if you'd like. diff strokes
for diff folks. I'd prefer selling mine, and, if no buyers, using 'em,
like you do yours. you have iron-framed Lange and Homan machines, or
what? do they jiggle, wiggle, and vibrate their way across the floors?
but you're not swapping YOURS in for the denver stuff. ok, I see...
  #8  
Old December 21st 03, 06:21 PM
Javahut
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Geez, talk about an attitude, well then you get what you sow.

I was speaking in a generality, yup , for the whole planet. You didn't
actually think I was responding for your benefit did you? You have been
trying to sell this outdated stuff for years and I don't ever recall seeing
an asking price. Just what are you expecting for this stuff?

I was making a reply so the whole world could see there is an easier,
better way of doing things than with antiquated overbuilt junk.
You call babbets the prefferred way of doing things compared to steel
bearings and grease? Ever wonder why nobody uses them anymore? Babbetts
wear, and they wear more with prolonged use, and most of the time they don't
wear evenly, and you have to CAST new ones, anybody know how? Besides
Dennis.

Gee, how long do babbetts last before they have to be recast? Have to have
a whole new history and education to maintain those dianosaurs, and what
about that "soft" wheel for smoothing, what is it good for if it won't
smooth and edge.

If they were all that great, why do you want to sell them? You are working
as a carpenter? If these machines were capable of knocking out those inches
per hour that the newer machines can you could double your income.

Nah, this response is FOR the rest of the world, to warn them that buying
antiques, that will never increase in value as an investment is a waste of
money.

And as for the learning curve to bevel on these machines, you picked it up
in minutes? yeah, right. Lets see a close up of some of those bevels so we
can see the facets or over polished break lines, if they are not there, why
aren't you still beveling on these hulks?

And I do bevel on Denver equipment, daily, and those machines are easy to
maintain and adaptable to diamond and increased production load, oh yeah,
and they operate on 220 volt single phase, with motors big enough to do the
job easily. For over 15 years on the same equipment with no breakdowns at
all. grease them once a month, easy.

Let any buyer beware of this equipment, in my opinion.


  #9  
Old December 21st 03, 07:10 PM
Moonraker
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Gawd, what an ego.

When you finally decide what you have is, indeed, boat anchors, maybe, just
maybe, you'll mercifully tie yerself to the last one you throw overboard.


"bill yohler" wrote in message
om...
"Javahut" wrote in message

...

Why put yourself to the grief?


no "grief" selling the machines; a post every six months or year or
so, on avg. someday the right guy will come along. till then, I deal
with "peanut gallery" type commentaries

Yeah, I know these machines have served you
well, but so did my old 386-25 computer.


didn't you say they're serving _you_ well, too? thought I heard you
say that...a little further down

The problem you have is that the learning curve needed to make these

produce
a good bevel is more than alot of people have in an age of necessary

high
production per hour.


unlike you, I can't 'speak to' the learning curve of ALL people on
earth. some of the more adept folks will 'grasp the concept' and
techniques neccessary in minutes, but others never will, with the
majority, I'd guess, falling somewhere in between on the learning bell
curve. but maybe you're better qualified to speak for everyone on the
PLANET than I?

snip
Here is the kicker, I bevel on equipment such as what you are selling,

but
if I were buying today the machines would have to do more inches per

hour.
It's just business.


each to his own, I always say...the guys I know that bevel still
"swear by" the old machines, and have diamond - wheeled machines in
their shops, too, in some cases.

By the way, its not that your machines aren't worth it, there just is

not
anyone left with the time and inclination to learn to bevel by hand on

that
type of machine.


here we go with the 'not anyone' sweeping generalizations of speaking
for 'everyone on earth' again - interesting.

I have a friend trying to sell a Denver 30" set. New it
was $13,000 fob Denver, they are down to $2000 and can't move it.
Same thing you have, rougher, smoother,with good Lombard wheel, incurve
rougher and smoother, cork and fiber wheels with polisher(30").
Are you willing to sell them that low? I doubt it.


see my earlier commentaries regarding "quality of machines currently
offered" with too-small bearings, undersized shafts, lightweight steel
frames, too small motors, etc etc. my machines were running about a
century before DGM stuff even existed, and will still be running after
DGM stuff's been melted down and turned to rebar.

By the way, the Smithsonian has a set, as does the Greenfield Village in
Dearborn, and the Center for Creative Studies in Detroit. Bet Wheaton
Village has some too! There isn't anyone left to donate them to either


speaking for 'the entire planet' again? so this means I might not find
a buyer in the next 15 minutes? that's kinda shocking :-/


Offshore and Pacific Rim are heavy into high speed diamond, even they

know
its more efficient, nobody does if for the joy and personal satisfaction

of
creation.


well, you're _still_ the self-appointed speaker for everyone on the
planet. cool sweeping generalizations. innacurate though they may be.
agreed, though, there aren't 'millions of buyers' waiting, like for
soldering irons and glasscutters, but, hey, that's life. I realize
this is a 'special interest' thing. some guys want dusenbergs, others
just want hyundai's

I bet you knew all this, I just didn't have anything else to do this

evening
so I thought I would be the nice guy before saying they are nothing

better
than a boat anchor.



you can use yours YOURS for "boat anchors" if you'd like. diff strokes
for diff folks. I'd prefer selling mine, and, if no buyers, using 'em,
like you do yours. you have iron-framed Lange and Homan machines, or
what? do they jiggle, wiggle, and vibrate their way across the floors?
but you're not swapping YOURS in for the denver stuff. ok, I see...



  #10  
Old December 21st 03, 07:20 PM
Moonraker
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Did Bill go and tug on Superman's cape? ;)




"Javahut" wrote in message
...
Geez, talk about an attitude, well then you get what you sow.

I was speaking in a generality, yup , for the whole planet. You didn't
actually think I was responding for your benefit did you? You have been
trying to sell this outdated stuff for years and I don't ever recall

seeing
an asking price. Just what are you expecting for this stuff?

I was making a reply so the whole world could see there is an easier,
better way of doing things than with antiquated overbuilt junk.
You call babbets the prefferred way of doing things compared to steel
bearings and grease? Ever wonder why nobody uses them anymore? Babbetts
wear, and they wear more with prolonged use, and most of the time they

don't
wear evenly, and you have to CAST new ones, anybody know how? Besides
Dennis.

Gee, how long do babbetts last before they have to be recast? Have to

have
a whole new history and education to maintain those dianosaurs, and what
about that "soft" wheel for smoothing, what is it good for if it won't
smooth and edge.

If they were all that great, why do you want to sell them? You are

working
as a carpenter? If these machines were capable of knocking out those

inches
per hour that the newer machines can you could double your income.

Nah, this response is FOR the rest of the world, to warn them that buying
antiques, that will never increase in value as an investment is a waste of
money.

And as for the learning curve to bevel on these machines, you picked it up
in minutes? yeah, right. Lets see a close up of some of those bevels so

we
can see the facets or over polished break lines, if they are not there,

why
aren't you still beveling on these hulks?

And I do bevel on Denver equipment, daily, and those machines are easy to
maintain and adaptable to diamond and increased production load, oh yeah,
and they operate on 220 volt single phase, with motors big enough to do

the
job easily. For over 15 years on the same equipment with no breakdowns at
all. grease them once a month, easy.

Let any buyer beware of this equipment, in my opinion.




 




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