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Knit Wool Outerwear



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 8th 05, 07:00 PM
Brenda Harris
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Hi Pandall,
Knit your coat in wool It will not felt from being out int he rain. The
lanolin will repel the water. And it breathes so body moisture can escape.
Wool has a memory - unlike cotton - so returns to it's original shape.
If you want it to felt, you would have to use hot hot water and add a bit of
detergent.
You can't beat wool.
Brenda


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  #2  
Old March 9th 05, 03:00 PM
Randall Nortman
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Default Knit Wool Outerwear

I've been thinking about knitting a coat or jacket, but I'm a little
worried about how well it would stand up to wet weather. I'm sure
that if I felted it it would be quite weather-resistant, but if I
leave it unfelted (like Sally Melville's Einstein coat, or
Zimmermann's Aran Coat), what will happen to it if I get caught in a
rain storm? Will it felt as I run for cover? Will it sag and
stretch, never returning to proper shape?

I also saw the recent discussion about ski sweaters here. Let's say
(just for the sake of argument, of course), that I'm a really awful
skier -- no wait, not me, let's say that a FRIEND of mine is a really
awful skier -- and let's say that I, er, I mean, that my FRIEND is
going to fall a lot when sking, and end up half buried in snow banks.
Would that be a good reason to wear a nylon shell, or will a good wool
sweater still do alright?

Thanks, as usual, for any advice...

--
Randall
  #3  
Old March 9th 05, 06:20 PM
Shillelagh
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"Randall Nortman" wrote in message
ink.net...
I've been thinking about knitting a coat or jacket, but I'm a little
worried about how well it would stand up to wet weather. I'm sure
that if I felted it it would be quite weather-resistant, but if I
leave it unfelted (like Sally Melville's Einstein coat, or
Zimmermann's Aran Coat), what will happen to it if I get caught in a
rain storm? Will it felt as I run for cover? Will it sag and
stretch, never returning to proper shape?


I'm no expert on wool, but if you buy a wool yarn with the lanolin still in
it, I think it would shed most of the water, just like it does on the sheep.
Others on the group who are more familiar with that type of wool will
probably be able to advise you regarding brands. I have a bag full of
Philosopher's wool which is just waiting for me to make a final choice on a
pattern and to have time to knit it. While making up a swatch, I noticed
that after knitting with it for a while, it made my hands really soft from
the lanolin in the wool. A felted sweater would probably be great for
warmth and wind resistance, but I'm wondering how heavy it would be.

Shelagh

I also saw the recent discussion about ski sweaters here. Let's say
(just for the sake of argument, of course), that I'm a really awful
skier -- no wait, not me, let's say that a FRIEND of mine is a really
awful skier -- and let's say that I, er, I mean, that my FRIEND is
going to fall a lot when sking, and end up half buried in snow banks.
Would that be a good reason to wear a nylon shell, or will a good wool
sweater still do alright?

Thanks, as usual, for any advice...

--
Randall



  #4  
Old March 10th 05, 12:24 AM
Randall Nortman
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On 2005-03-09, Shillelagh wrote:

I'm no expert on wool, but if you buy a wool yarn with the lanolin still in
it, I think it would shed most of the water, just like it does on the sheep.

[...]

This had occured to me, actually, but won't the lanolin be removed
when it is washed? Or does it take more than just a little soap and
gentle handwashing to remove the lanolin? (I don't often wash my
coats, but it is occasionally necessary.)

--
Randall
  #5  
Old March 11th 05, 01:31 AM
Shillelagh
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"Randall Nortman" wrote in message
ink.net...
On 2005-03-09, Shillelagh wrote:

I'm no expert on wool, but if you buy a wool yarn with the lanolin still

in
it, I think it would shed most of the water, just like it does on the

sheep.
[...]

This had occured to me, actually, but won't the lanolin be removed
when it is washed? Or does it take more than just a little soap and
gentle handwashing to remove the lanolin? (I don't often wash my
coats, but it is occasionally necessary.)
Randall


Sorry, I've only recently been converted to the wonders of wool, so have no
first hand experience. Maybe some of the more "wool-wise" people on the
group can help with that one. My gut feeling - you would have to wash it
many times to get rid of all the lanolin... but I could be wrong. Heh,
heh, - just make sure you wear your anti perspirant/deoderant, so you don't
have to wash it often.

Shelagh


 




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