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Pickle Pot



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 22nd 04, 04:24 PM
Charlie
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Default Pickle Pot

Sorry, I've had lots of questions lately! Could a pickle pot be as simple
as a small Pyrex dish with a lid on the lowest (electric) hob setting? My
"studio" is my kitchen so it would be convenient! I could probably stretch
to a slow cooker type thing which I've seen recommended but I'd have to
store it somewhere!

Charlie.


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  #2  
Old August 22nd 04, 07:09 PM
Andy Parker
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Charlie
yes, absolutely - don't forget pickle works cold, it is just slower!

Andy Parker, Agate House Lapidary
Ulverston, Cumbria, England

www.agatehouse.co.uk
Tel: 01229 584023
  #3  
Old August 22nd 04, 08:16 PM
NE333RO
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Sorry, I've had lots of questions lately! Could a pickle pot be as simple
as a small Pyrex dish with a lid on the lowest (electric) hob setting?


It could, as long as your low setting is not too hot. I've always been
partial to a small, cheapy, crock pot myself. Do you intend to dump out your
pickle each time you finish using it? Thats the only reason I can see for a
storage problem. That could get a bit expensive if you have to remake your
pickle each time. Not to mention environmentally unfriendly.
  #4  
Old August 22nd 04, 11:57 PM
William Black
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"NE333RO" wrote in message
...
Sorry, I've had lots of questions lately! Could a pickle pot be as

simple
as a small Pyrex dish with a lid on the lowest (electric) hob setting?


It could, as long as your low setting is not too hot. I've always been
partial to a small, cheapy, crock pot myself. Do you intend to dump out

your
pickle each time you finish using it? Thats the only reason I can see for

a
storage problem. That could get a bit expensive if you have to remake your
pickle each time. Not to mention environmentally unfriendly.


Well pickle doesn't 'go off' with use. The chemistry is reasonably basic if
you use acid and the stuff should last for ages if you filter it now and
again.

I'm not sure about the chemistry of 'safety pickle'.

--
William Black
------------------
Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords
is no basis for a system of government


  #5  
Old August 22nd 04, 11:57 PM
Kendall Davies
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BE VERY CAREFUL heating Pyrex on direct heat, it can explode into hundreds
of razor sharp fragments if its the ordinary everyday kind. I'm sure lots
of people will say that they have done it safely but I've had something
explode and it is potentially lethal.

I'd put the Pyrex pot in another container (an old saucepan maybe) and
carefully pour in hot water to surround it, but not so deep as to make the
pickle pot float. It might suit your requirements and be warm enough just
like that.

If you have to heat the pan do so very gently that the water does not boil
and tip up the pickle pot.

Don't leave this unattended as the water has an unhelpful knack of boiling
dry and your in the potentially exploding Pyrex situation once more.

Hope this helps - Kendall




"Charlie" wrote in message
...
Sorry, I've had lots of questions lately! Could a pickle pot be as simple
as a small Pyrex dish with a lid on the lowest (electric) hob setting? My
"studio" is my kitchen so it would be convenient! I could probably

stretch
to a slow cooker type thing which I've seen recommended but I'd have to
store it somewhere!

Charlie.


---
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  #6  
Old August 23rd 04, 12:59 AM
KG
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My
"studio" is my kitchen so it would be convenient!


A couple of points of safety here...

1. Don't reuse the pot for anything you'll be consuming. And don't toss it
into the dishwasher with your other dishes.

2. Keep it covered when you're not using it, to avoid contamination, and
well ventilated when it's hot. Be careful about any type of splashes/spills
into food preparation areas, including if you're using your kitchen sink to
fill/discard it.

2A. Remain alert for things that can react with acids and keep them well
away... baking soda leaps immediately to mind.

3. Are you SURE you want your kitchen as your studio??? There are a lot of
chemicals, metal filings, and nasty bits of particulate matter that are
generated as the typical silversmith works -- whether it's polishing using a
rotary tool or filing edges with a hand file. And those things, if they get
into food prep, can be pretty nasty. Some can be downright dangerous.

There's also the inconvenience of setting up/taking down each time you want
to transition between work space and food space. To do that properly and
safely will mean quite a bit of cleaning time.

If there is an alternate space that you can use, you might be much better
served.

KG


  #7  
Old August 23rd 04, 04:10 PM
Charlie
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Default


"KG" wrote in message
...

3. Are you SURE you want your kitchen as your studio??? There are a lot

of
chemicals, metal filings, and nasty bits of particulate matter that are
generated as the typical silversmith works -- whether it's polishing using

a
rotary tool or filing edges with a hand file. And those things, if they

get
into food prep, can be pretty nasty. Some can be downright dangerous.


I use my lounge for that sort of thing!

There's also the inconvenience of setting up/taking down each time you

want
to transition between work space and food space. To do that properly and
safely will mean quite a bit of cleaning time.


That's why it's a hobby, not my main income.


If there is an alternate space that you can use, you might be much better
served.


I don't have much choice, I have a bedroom, lounge, kitchen and bathroom.
It's a first floor flat!

Charlie.


KG




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  #8  
Old August 24th 04, 04:44 AM
Lamedeer
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I work with silver only and I never heat my pickle pot. I find it to be not
necessary. But, I'm not concerned about volume production.

If you are concerned about using sulfuric acid (Sparex) in the kitchen then,
if you are working with silver, Tarnex works as well although differently.
It's not as toxic. But, your pickle pot probably isn't as acidic as the
vinigar you use unless you mix it to the point of non-ionization.



"Charlie" wrote in message
...
Sorry, I've had lots of questions lately! Could a pickle pot be as simple
as a small Pyrex dish with a lid on the lowest (electric) hob setting? My
"studio" is my kitchen so it would be convenient! I could probably

stretch
to a slow cooker type thing which I've seen recommended but I'd have to
store it somewhere!

Charlie.


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.742 / Virus Database: 495 - Release Date: 19/08/2004




  #9  
Old August 24th 04, 05:26 AM
Peter W.. Rowe,
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Default

On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 20:44:10 -0700, in  "Lamedeer"
wrote:

I work with silver only and I never heat my pickle pot. I find it to be not
necessary. But, I'm not concerned about volume production.


Cold is also a lot safer, and then you can store it just in something like a
tupperware plastic container, and use it there too (so long as the silver is cool
before you put it in the pickle)


If you are concerned about using sulfuric acid (Sparex) in the kitchen then,
if you are working with silver, Tarnex works as well although differently.
It's not as toxic. But, your pickle pot probably isn't as acidic as the
vinigar you use unless you mix it to the point of non-ionization.


Sparex is considerably safer than actual sulphuric acid, primarily in that it
doesn't fume the way the acid does, and though it will still attack things like
cotton fabric or wood, it doesn't significantly (or at least, rapidly) burn skin.

Tarnex is not actually a pickle. It is Thiourea, and acts pretty much only to
remove silver or copper sulphides, which is the black tarnish one sees forming
over time (or with liver of sulphur) on sterling. However, it doesn't
effectively remove copper OXIDES, which are what form upon heating and
soldering, and is not much more effective at removing flux residues than is plain
water.

Alternatives to Sparex that have been mentioned in this group or elsewhere a

the same chemical, but cheaper, and purer than the jewelry tools supply versions,
sold at hardware stores or spa and swimming pool supply places, as products named
things like "ph down" or "spa down", used for reducing the ph of the water in
such things. Look for a product who's main ingredient is sodium bisulphate.
Thats the main active ingredient in Sparex and the other professional products,
but packaged for pool use, actually seems usually cheaper, and purer. works the
same, with a bit less mess (Sparex brand tends to produce a yellowish scum that
leaves an annoying ring on ones container...

Citric acid. Can be food grade or industrial. used in much the same way as
sparex, either cold or warmed. considerably slower than sodium bisulphate
pickles, but is reported to be quite effective even so, if one has some patience.
And unlike the sodium bisulphate, it's essentially non-toxic in all but the most
concentrated forms (be careful not to inhale the dry powder)

Alum, as used in making pickles (the cucumber type). Found in the spice section
of the grocery store. Much more effective when hot. A bit slow as a pickle for
removing oxides, but works well enough. Has a long established traditional
jewelry use as well, as a solvent for removing broken steel drill bits from gold
or silver without any harm to those metals. For that use, it's boiled...

One reader at one point reported using vinegar and a bit of salt. I've not tried
that, but he/she said it seemed to work... Once you've used it to dissolve
soldering flux and oxides, you probably should not, when you're done with the
jewelry, use the waste pickle in your salad dressing...

Hope that helps.

Peter Rowe

  #10  
Old August 24th 04, 04:30 PM
Carl 1 Lucky Texan
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Default



Peter W.. Rowe, wrote:
On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 20:44:10 -0700, in =F4=07=F4 "Lamedeer" [email protected]=

delphia.net
wrote:
=20
=20
-------------snip--------------------

Citric acid. Can be food grade or industrial. used in much the same w=

ay as
sparex, either cold or warmed. considerably slower than sodium bisulph=

ate
pickles, but is reported to be quite effective even so, if one has some=

patience.
And unlike the sodium bisulphate, it's essentially non-toxic in all but=

the most
concentrated forms (be careful not to inhale the dry powder)


I use citric acid and, at least heated in a 'crock pot' it works fast=20
enough for my poor attempts at silver work, I'm never waiting for it. It=20
can be bought at ingredient suppliers and some candle/potpourri type=20
sites. Also for the baking industry - as 'sour salt'.


One reader at one point reported using vinegar and a bit of salt. I've=

not tried
that, but he/she said it seemed to work... Once you've used it to diss=

olve
soldering flux and oxides, you probably should not, when you're done w=

ith the
jewelry, use the waste pickle in your salad dressing...


I THINK the addtion of salt to vinegar yields a weak nitric acid. This=20
is widely used by enamelists and does seem to work well for them in=20
preparing copper and silver for base coats/whatever.

Carl
1 Lucky Texan



--=20
to reply, change ( .not) to ( .net)
 




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