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The Tailor's 'S'



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 27th 03, 12:37 AM
Bloddy
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Default The Tailor's 'S'

Can anybody help?

I'm looking for information on the sewing geometry of the Tailor's 'S'. As I
understand it, it's a method of stitching material that produces a neat turn
around a right angled bend instead of leaving a fold of unwanted material.
TIA.


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  #2  
Old November 28th 03, 09:28 PM
Bloddy
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"Bloddy" wrote in message
...
Can anybody help?

I'm looking for information on the sewing geometry of the Tailor's 'S'. As

I
understand it, it's a method of stitching material that produces a neat

turn
around a right angled bend instead of leaving a fold of unwanted material.
TIA.


Not being a sewist grin, it appears that I have confused a couple of
you.... sorry.

So in answer to the your questions..
No this is not a wind up.
Yes I do have a use.
No I know nothing much about the art of sewing.

Apologies for not answering your emails in person. However, I does seem that
if somebody can answer the question then a number of us will learn something
new if I keep the postings within the groups(s).

Here goes. I need the information to arrange the sewing of a skirt for a
hovercraft [it holds in the air to help create the air cushion that the
craft 'sits' on]. Generally, smaller craft use a segmented skirt. I won't
bore you with the details just let you know that I understand the geometry
of the pattern involved for the segmented type. However, this is when I duck
my head and feel stupid and admit that I can't work out the geometry to turn
a right angle if a single piece of material is used.

There is a pattern (or geometrical shape/relationship) that Tailors use to
mark out a piece of material for cutting/stitching around corners that
retain the loci. To the best of my knowledge it is called the Tailors' 'S'.
You may know it by another name. Please, please.... If you can't answer
fully, hints will help. Please post replies to the group. I'm just a 'fick
ungineer wiv' a problem to solve. I'm sorry I don't speak the language of
your craft, but I could do with your help.

Many thanks in advance


  #4  
Old November 29th 03, 03:42 AM
Kay Lancaster
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Default

I've never heard the term "tailor's S" before, but I assume you
want to make a mitered corner. Here's a way of mitering a separate
binding that will go on a piece of fabric:
http://www.frommarti.com/miter.html
and a method that involves just the piece of fabric itself (used for
hemming curtains):
http://www.denverfabrics.com/pages/s...nd-curtain.htm

Kay Lancaster

  #5  
Old November 30th 03, 04:31 PM
Bloddy
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"Tia Mary-remove nekoluvr to reply " wrote in
message ...
From: "Bloddy"


....... There is a pattern (or geometrical shape/relationship) that

Tailors
use to
mark out a piece of material for cutting/stitching around corners that
retain the loci. ......


I am trying to picture this in my mind and am having a bit of

difficulty.

grin me also

Obviously, you aren't making a 90 degree turn around a corner like you

would if
you were going around the edge of the front of a table to the side of a

table
-- vertically . Are you making the right angle turn within the same

plane? As
in going along one edge of the TOP of a table and then making the turn to

go
along the adjacent edge of the TOP of the table -- horizontally? If

*that* is
the case -- 90 degree turn in the same plane, then you need to make a

mitered
corner somehow. There are many different ways to do this but anyone who

sews
much would know what it is you need.
would there be any diagrams online that you could lead us to? Might

make it
easier to understand just what info it is you need. CiaoMeow ^;;^

snip

Lets see if I can explain this in more detail. Using your example, the top
and bottom edges of the material have to follow the shape of the table in
the horizontal plane. Thus in the vertical plane all distances top and
bottom are the same in the perpendicular. However, and maybe the thing I've
not explained properly, when air is pumped into the skirt it flares or
swells to form a curve. The skirt swells up and looks like ...(I...

The bracket represents the skirt filled with air and the 'I' the side of the
craft. A mitre doesn't work because it removes material. I need to add
material. The skirt has to retain the (I shape around the right angled turn.
I hope this helps. I'll try to post a link in the next couple of days that
show the detail of what I need to do. TIA

Mmm... a cat lover. Thumbs up and tail high.


  #6  
Old November 30th 03, 07:36 PM
Tia Mary-remove nekoluvr to reply
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Default

From: "Bloddy"

...... The skirt swells up and looks like ...(I...

The bracket represents the skirt filled with air and the 'I' the side of the
craft. A mitre doesn't work because it removes material. I need to add
material. The skirt has to retain the (I shape around the right angled turn.
I hope this helps. ..........


HMMM -- DARTS -- maybe darts are what you need, do you think? First off,
do you know what I mean by a dart? A section of fabric that is V shape -- you
put the two sides of the V together and sew along the lines. This makes the
edge of the fabric (up there where the sides of the V are sewn together)
smaller than the body of the fabric (down there where the point of the V is)
and allows for going around curves. It's what is used to form a garment to a
womans bust area. I could see putting darts at the top and the bottom of the
"skirt" so that you could make the turn around the corner of the boat and still
have the fullness through the middle of the fabric area. IF it's darts you
need, I have no idea if a few large ones would be better than a bunch of
smaller ones -- that's probably something that would be based on the air flow
dynamics of the hovercraft.
If you get a pic online, be sure to post and let us know OK? You guessed I
am a cat lover -- smart of you :-))! CiaoMeow ^;;^
..
PAX, Tia Mary ^;;^ Queen of Kitties
Angels can't show their wings on earth but nothing was ever said about their
WHISKERS!!
Nothing is complete without a few cat hairs!

  #7  
Old November 30th 03, 07:42 PM
Tia Mary-remove nekoluvr to reply
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Default

Posting another thought -- maybe you should have the skirt made with
gussets? This option would add fullness to the body of the skirt but not to
the edges. A gusset is a diamond shaoped piece of fabric added that give
additional fabric to the piece -- like that little funky piece of fabric they
add to gloves right there where the first finger slopes down and turns into the
thumb. Does that make sense?? I am sure you could find pictures online. Kate
(in the UK) who quilts and does costumes and a bunch of other stuff like that
has a website and she probably has some pics or links to sites that would give
a visual for you. CiaoMeow ^;;^
..
PAX, Tia Mary ^;;^ Queen of Kitties
Angels can't show their wings on earth but nothing was ever said about their
WHISKERS!!
Nothing is complete without a few cat hairs!

  #8  
Old December 2nd 03, 08:46 PM
Cynthia Nottingham \(MS\)
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Default

This sounds like an inverted pleat to me... They do this for couch skirtings
and stuff at the corners. Like the red skirted chair about 1\2 way down:
http://www.taunton.com/threads/pages/t00131.asp

If you did an inverted pleat on the top and bottom, you would get the
fullness to still balloon at a corner...

Am I making sense?

Thanks


"Bloddy" wrote in message
...

"Tia Mary-remove nekoluvr to reply " wrote in
message ...
From: "Bloddy"


....... There is a pattern (or geometrical shape/relationship) that

Tailors
use to
mark out a piece of material for cutting/stitching around corners that
retain the loci. ......


I am trying to picture this in my mind and am having a bit of

difficulty.

grin me also

Obviously, you aren't making a 90 degree turn around a corner like you

would if
you were going around the edge of the front of a table to the side of a

table
-- vertically . Are you making the right angle turn within the same

plane? As
in going along one edge of the TOP of a table and then making the turn

to
go
along the adjacent edge of the TOP of the table -- horizontally? If

*that* is
the case -- 90 degree turn in the same plane, then you need to make a

mitered
corner somehow. There are many different ways to do this but anyone who

sews
much would know what it is you need.
would there be any diagrams online that you could lead us to? Might

make it
easier to understand just what info it is you need. CiaoMeow ^;;^

snip

Lets see if I can explain this in more detail. Using your example, the

top
and bottom edges of the material have to follow the shape of the table in
the horizontal plane. Thus in the vertical plane all distances top and
bottom are the same in the perpendicular. However, and maybe the thing

I've
not explained properly, when air is pumped into the skirt it flares or
swells to form a curve. The skirt swells up and looks like ...(I...

The bracket represents the skirt filled with air and the 'I' the side of

the
craft. A mitre doesn't work because it removes material. I need to add
material. The skirt has to retain the (I shape around the right angled

turn.
I hope this helps. I'll try to post a link in the next couple of days that
show the detail of what I need to do. TIA

Mmm... a cat lover. Thumbs up and tail high.




 




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