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Continental Style knitting



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 28th 09, 07:10 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
L
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 180
Default Continental Style knitting

I KNOW 'continental style' knitting (where the yarn is held in the left
hand, as in crochet) is faster than 'American style' (where you hold the
yarn in your right hand and 'throw' it over the needle). I've seen the
video's.

But, oh, the learning!

With a niece and a nephew each expecting an addition to their families, I
figured a baby blanket would be the perfect way to learn this new (to me)
method. I chose one that was primarily garter stitch (re-learn one stitch at
a time!). I find it much slower than my 'throw' method because the movements
are new. And, each time I pick it up, I find myself 'reverting' to my old
method out of habit!

So, I will try and persevere, because I have so many knitted projects in my
head right now I could certainly use a faster way to knit.

Lisa in NJ

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  #2  
Old February 28th 09, 09:14 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
suzee[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 61
Default Continental Style knitting

L wrote:
I KNOW 'continental style' knitting (where the yarn is held in the left
hand, as in crochet) is faster than 'American style' (where you hold the
yarn in your right hand and 'throw' it over the needle). I've seen the
video's.


The videos are misleading. I don't make such large movements with my
right hand, it barely leaves the needle. And the fastest knitter knits
English style.

But, oh, the learning!

With a niece and a nephew each expecting an addition to their families,
I figured a baby blanket would be the perfect way to learn this new (to
me) method. I chose one that was primarily garter stitch (re-learn one
stitch at a time!). I find it much slower than my 'throw' method because
the movements are new. And, each time I pick it up, I find myself
'reverting' to my old method out of habit!

So, I will try and persevere, because I have so many knitted projects in
my head right now I could certainly use a faster way to knit.


Check youtube for different ways `throwers' knit; you'll find that many
of them don't throw. Here's a few to get you started, the first one is
similar to how I knit, and also read the comments -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCO8qALs4-w
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xSRqavicgc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JeTmm_EwZq0

sue
  #3  
Old March 1st 09, 03:38 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
Olwyn Mary
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 459
Default Continental Style knitting

suzee wrote:
L wrote:

I KNOW 'continental style' knitting (where the yarn is held in the
left hand, as in crochet) is faster than 'American style' (where you
hold the yarn in your right hand and 'throw' it over the needle). I've
seen the video's.



Not necessarily!

With a niece and a nephew each expecting an addition to their
families, I figured a baby blanket would be the perfect way to learn
this new (to me) method. I chose one that was primarily garter stitch
(re-learn one stitch at a time!). I find it much slower than my
'throw' method because the movements are new. And, each time I pick it
up, I find myself 'reverting' to my old method out of habit!

So, I will try and persevere, because I have so many knitted projects
in my head right now I could certainly use a faster way to knit.



Check youtube for different ways `throwers' knit; you'll find that many
of them don't throw. Here's a few to get you started, the first one is
similar to how I knit, and also read the comments -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCO8qALs4-w
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xSRqavicgc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JeTmm_EwZq0

sue


I knit very much faster in English style, but then, that's how I was
taught as a little girl in England. What is not shown, and what
contributes a lot to my speed, is the fact that I use 14" straight
needles, with the right needle held firmly in my right armpit, leaving
the fingers of my right hand free to manipulate the yarn. So, with that
needle stable, I can use a sort of combination of the "i'm a thrower"
and "I'm a flicker" styles.

When I discovered circular needles, I had to switch to Continental
stitch, but as I am holding both needles then, I am not nearly so fast.
However, if I am knitting on a plane where I don't want to jab my
seatmate with the needles, Continental style is necessary! Also, it is
amazing how many stitches you can cram onto a 14" straight - I once knit
a triangular shawl on them - but for some very wide projects, long circs
are just more convenient.

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans
  #4  
Old March 1st 09, 04:19 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
lucille
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,035
Default Continental Style knitting


"Olwyn Mary" wrote in message
...
suzee wrote:
L wrote:

I KNOW 'continental style' knitting (where the yarn is held in the left
hand, as in crochet) is faster than 'American style' (where you hold the
yarn in your right hand and 'throw' it over the needle). I've seen the
video's.



Not necessarily!

With a niece and a nephew each expecting an addition to their families,
I figured a baby blanket would be the perfect way to learn this new (to
me) method. I chose one that was primarily garter stitch (re-learn one
stitch at a time!). I find it much slower than my 'throw' method because
the movements are new. And, each time I pick it up, I find myself
'reverting' to my old method out of habit!

So, I will try and persevere, because I have so many knitted projects in
my head right now I could certainly use a faster way to knit.



Check youtube for different ways `throwers' knit; you'll find that many
of them don't throw. Here's a few to get you started, the first one is
similar to how I knit, and also read the comments -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCO8qALs4-w
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xSRqavicgc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JeTmm_EwZq0

sue


I knit very much faster in English style, but then, that's how I was
taught as a little girl in England. What is not shown, and what
contributes a lot to my speed, is the fact that I use 14" straight
needles, with the right needle held firmly in my right armpit, leaving the
fingers of my right hand free to manipulate the yarn. So, with that
needle stable, I can use a sort of combination of the "i'm a thrower" and
"I'm a flicker" styles.

When I discovered circular needles, I had to switch to Continental stitch,
but as I am holding both needles then, I am not nearly so fast. However,
if I am knitting on a plane where I don't want to jab my seatmate with the
needles, Continental style is necessary! Also, it is amazing how many
stitches you can cram onto a 14" straight - I once knit a triangular shawl
on them - but for some very wide projects, long circs are just more
convenient.

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans


I knit very fast using Continental and English style slows me down to a
crawl. I think it's all in the way you learned as a kid.


  #5  
Old March 1st 09, 05:31 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
Spike Driver
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 606
Default Continental Style knitting

L wrote:
I KNOW 'continental style' knitting (where the yarn is held in the left
hand, as in crochet) is faster than 'American style' (where you hold the
yarn in your right hand and 'throw' it over the needle). I've seen the
video's.

But, oh, the learning!

With a niece and a nephew each expecting an addition to their families,
I figured a baby blanket would be the perfect way to learn this new (to
me) method. I chose one that was primarily garter stitch (re-learn one
stitch at a time!). I find it much slower than my 'throw' method because
the movements are new. And, each time I pick it up, I find myself
'reverting' to my old method out of habit!

So, I will try and persevere, because I have so many knitted projects in
my head right now I could certainly use a faster way to knit.

Lisa in NJ

Lisa,

I have knitted for 28 years. I have been knitting continental for about
15 years. I found that eventually it became a lot faster than the
English method. It did take a while.

Dennis
  #6  
Old March 1st 09, 05:33 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
Spike Driver
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 606
Default Continental Style knitting

L wrote:
I KNOW 'continental style' knitting (where the yarn is held in the left
hand, as in crochet) is faster than 'American style' (where you hold the
yarn in your right hand and 'throw' it over the needle). I've seen the
video's.

But, oh, the learning!

With a niece and a nephew each expecting an addition to their families,
I figured a baby blanket would be the perfect way to learn this new (to
me) method. I chose one that was primarily garter stitch (re-learn one
stitch at a time!). I find it much slower than my 'throw' method because
the movements are new. And, each time I pick it up, I find myself
'reverting' to my old method out of habit!

So, I will try and persevere, because I have so many knitted projects in
my head right now I could certainly use a faster way to knit.

Lisa in NJ


I have knitted for 28 years. I have been knitting continental for about
15 years. I found that eventually it became a lot faster than the
English method. It did take a while.

Dennis
  #7  
Old March 1st 09, 04:48 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
Gerald & Donna McIntosh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 60
Default Continental Style knitting


"lucille" wrote in message
...

"Olwyn Mary" wrote in message
...
suzee wrote:
L wrote:

I KNOW 'continental style' knitting (where the yarn is held in the left
hand, as in crochet) is faster than 'American style' (where you hold
the yarn in your right hand and 'throw' it over the needle). I've seen
the video's.


Not necessarily!

With a niece and a nephew each expecting an addition to their families,
I figured a baby blanket would be the perfect way to learn this new (to
me) method. I chose one that was primarily garter stitch (re-learn one
stitch at a time!). I find it much slower than my 'throw' method
because the movements are new. And, each time I pick it up, I find
myself 'reverting' to my old method out of habit!

So, I will try and persevere, because I have so many knitted projects
in my head right now I could certainly use a faster way to knit.


Check youtube for different ways `throwers' knit; you'll find that many
of them don't throw. Here's a few to get you started, the first one is
similar to how I knit, and also read the comments -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCO8qALs4-w
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xSRqavicgc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JeTmm_EwZq0

sue


I knit very much faster in English style, but then, that's how I was
taught as a little girl in England. What is not shown, and what
contributes a lot to my speed, is the fact that I use 14" straight
needles, with the right needle held firmly in my right armpit, leaving
the fingers of my right hand free to manipulate the yarn. So, with that
needle stable, I can use a sort of combination of the "i'm a thrower" and
"I'm a flicker" styles.

When I discovered circular needles, I had to switch to Continental
stitch, but as I am holding both needles then, I am not nearly so fast.
However, if I am knitting on a plane where I don't want to jab my
seatmate with the needles, Continental style is necessary! Also, it is
amazing how many stitches you can cram onto a 14" straight - I once knit
a triangular shawl on them - but for some very wide projects, long circs
are just more convenient.

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans


I knit very fast using Continental and English style slows me down to a
crawl. I think it's all in the way you learned as a kid.


I figure that as long as what you're doing results in a knitted piece, that
whatever works for you is right! I taught myself riding on the train when
stationed in London while in the US Navy. matter of fact, I still have some
wool that I bought when I was there over 25 years ago.

Donna in S. Indiana



  #8  
Old March 1st 09, 05:59 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
suzee[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 61
Default Continental Style knitting

lucille wrote:

"Olwyn Mary" wrote in message
...
suzee wrote:
L wrote:

I KNOW 'continental style' knitting (where the yarn is held in the
left hand, as in crochet) is faster than 'American style' (where you
hold the yarn in your right hand and 'throw' it over the needle).
I've seen the video's.


Not necessarily!

With a niece and a nephew each expecting an addition to their
families, I figured a baby blanket would be the perfect way to learn
this new (to me) method. I chose one that was primarily garter
stitch (re-learn one stitch at a time!). I find it much slower than
my 'throw' method because the movements are new. And, each time I
pick it up, I find myself 'reverting' to my old method out of habit!

So, I will try and persevere, because I have so many knitted
projects in my head right now I could certainly use a faster way to
knit.


Check youtube for different ways `throwers' knit; you'll find that
many of them don't throw. Here's a few to get you started, the first
one is similar to how I knit, and also read the comments -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCO8qALs4-w
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xSRqavicgc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JeTmm_EwZq0

sue


I knit very much faster in English style, but then, that's how I was
taught as a little girl in England. What is not shown, and what
contributes a lot to my speed, is the fact that I use 14" straight
needles, with the right needle held firmly in my right armpit, leaving
the fingers of my right hand free to manipulate the yarn. So, with
that needle stable, I can use a sort of combination of the "i'm a
thrower" and "I'm a flicker" styles.

When I discovered circular needles, I had to switch to Continental
stitch, but as I am holding both needles then, I am not nearly so
fast. However, if I am knitting on a plane where I don't want to jab
my seatmate with the needles, Continental style is necessary! Also,
it is amazing how many stitches you can cram onto a 14" straight - I
once knit a triangular shawl on them - but for some very wide
projects, long circs are just more convenient.

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans


I knit very fast using Continental and English style slows me down to a
crawl. I think it's all in the way you learned as a kid.


Not everyone learned as a kid, though. Some people switch and find out
the other style may suit them better, therefore they're 'faster' with
it. It's all in what the individual is more comfortable with.

sue
  #9  
Old March 1st 09, 06:18 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
Linda D.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 93
Default Continental Style knitting

On Feb 28, 6:38*pm, Olwyn Mary wrote:
suzee wrote:
L wrote:


I KNOW 'continental style' knitting (where the yarn is held in the
left hand, as in crochet) is faster than 'American style' (where you
hold the yarn in your right hand and 'throw' it over the needle). I've
seen the video's.


Not necessarily!



With a niece and a nephew each expecting an addition to their
families, I figured a baby blanket would be the perfect way to learn
this new (to me) method. I chose one that was primarily garter stitch
(re-learn one stitch at a time!). I find it much slower than my
'throw' method because the movements are new. And, each time I pick it
up, I find myself 'reverting' to my old method out of habit!


So, I will try and persevere, because I have so many knitted projects
in my head right now I could certainly use a faster way to knit.


Check youtube for different ways `throwers' knit; you'll find that many
of them don't throw. Here's a few to get you started, the first one is
similar to how I knit, and also read the comments -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCO8qALs4-w
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xSRqavicgc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JeTmm_EwZq0


sue


I knit very much faster in English style, but then, that's how I was
taught as a little girl in England. What is not shown, and what
contributes a lot to my speed, is the fact that I use 14" straight
needles, with the right needle held firmly in my right armpit, leaving
the fingers of my right hand free to manipulate the yarn. *So, with that
needle stable, I can use a sort of combination of the "i'm a thrower"
and "I'm a flicker" styles.

When I discovered circular needles, I had to switch to Continental
stitch, but as I am holding both needles then, I am not nearly so fast.
* *However, if I am knitting on a plane where I don't want to jab my
seatmate with the needles, Continental style is necessary! *Also, it is
amazing how many stitches you can cram onto a 14" straight - I once knit
a triangular shawl on them - but for some very wide projects, long circs
are just more convenient.

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans


Why did you feel the need to switch to the Continental Style of
knitting when you work with circular needles?

99% of the time I use circular needles and always knit English Style.
I'm just not sure why you would need to switch styles.

take care, Linda D. in B.C., Canada
  #10  
Old March 1st 09, 06:25 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
Linda D.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 93
Default Continental Style knitting

On Feb 28, 12:14*pm, suzee wrote:
The videos are misleading. I don't make such large movements with my
right hand, it barely leaves the needle. And the fastest knitter knits
English style.

Check youtube for different ways `throwers' knit; you'll find that many
of them don't throw. Here's a few to get you started, the first one is
similar to how I knit, and also read the comments -http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCO8qALs4-whttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xSRqavicgchttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JeTmm_EwZq0

sue


Hi Sue,

The worlds fastest knitter knits Continental Style:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFi0n...eature=related

The UK's fastest knitter knits English Style:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WjEh7acrr5o

I've tried knitting Continental Style, but am slow as molasses, and
need lots more practice. I'm much more comfortable knitting English
Style, and that's the way I was taught.

take care, Linda D. in B.C., Canada
 




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