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Suggestions for restyling a tiny vintage dress?



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 28th 03, 12:39 AM
BijouEtBeau
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Default Suggestions for restyling a tiny vintage dress?

I recently picked up a slightly damaged vintage evening gown many
sizes too small for me, because I wanted to pick off the trims for
another project - heh, heh. The trims were just tacked on and came
off easily.

Once I stripped the trim off, I could see the fabric itself is
gorgeous. I desperately want to adapt it into something to fit me,
and I think I have figured out how I will restyle and repair the
bodice and sleeves but I'm uber-pearshaped and whomever this was made
for was slim hipped, so it's the barely a-line 7 panel skirt that has
me a bit stumped.

It's so narrow that if I enlarge it by adding godets/gores in a
coordinating fabric, the insets will have to go all the way up to meet
the bodice. I'm afraid that will look too much like a circus tent!

I'm wondering if I could flip the panels so the current hem becomes
the waistline and then use the insets to fill in the gaps that would
naturally be created below? - but I can't really envision it in my
head. Has anyone ever tried this? Did it work? Or does anyone have
another idea? I hate to just add a big wide panel of the contrast
fabric, now that I've figured out how to restyle the bodice so it
won't look patchy.
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  #2  
Old August 28th 03, 03:49 PM
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Have you seen some of the newer fashions where the panels of the skirt
swirl around instead of going straight? They are often shown in
contrasting colors- but that may not be necessary with your project.
Just an idea- I have no practical experience making on eo fhtese- I am
sure that there are patterns out there to get ideas from.

Julie
Richmond, VA

said...
I recently picked up a slightly damaged vintage evening gown many
sizes too small for me, because I wanted to pick off the trims for
another project - heh, heh. The trims were just tacked on and came
off easily.

Once I stripped the trim off, I could see the fabric itself is
gorgeous. I desperately want to adapt it into something to fit me,
and I think I have figured out how I will restyle and repair the
bodice and sleeves but I'm uber-pearshaped and whomever this was made
for was slim hipped, so it's the barely a-line 7 panel skirt that has
me a bit stumped.

It's so narrow that if I enlarge it by adding godets/gores in a
coordinating fabric, the insets will have to go all the way up to meet
the bodice. I'm afraid that will look too much like a circus tent!

I'm wondering if I could flip the panels so the current hem becomes
the waistline and then use the insets to fill in the gaps that would
naturally be created below? - but I can't really envision it in my
head. Has anyone ever tried this? Did it work? Or does anyone have
another idea? I hate to just add a big wide panel of the contrast
fabric, now that I've figured out how to restyle the bodice so it
won't look patchy.

  #3  
Old August 29th 03, 03:12 AM
L. Kelly
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Posts: n/a
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"BijouEtBeau" wrote in message
om...
| I recently picked up a slightly damaged vintage evening gown many
| sizes too small for me, because I wanted to pick off the trims for
| another project - heh, heh. The trims were just tacked on and came
| off easily.
|
| Once I stripped the trim off, I could see the fabric itself is
| gorgeous. I desperately want to adapt it into something to fit me,
| and I think I have figured out how I will restyle and repair the
| bodice and sleeves but I'm uber-pearshaped and whomever this was made
| for was slim hipped, so it's the barely a-line 7 panel skirt that has
| me a bit stumped.
|
| It's so narrow that if I enlarge it by adding godets/gores in a
| coordinating fabric, the insets will have to go all the way up to meet
| the bodice. I'm afraid that will look too much like a circus tent!
|
| I'm wondering if I could flip the panels so the current hem becomes
| the waistline and then use the insets to fill in the gaps that would
| naturally be created below? - but I can't really envision it in my
| head. Has anyone ever tried this? Did it work? Or does anyone have
| another idea? I hate to just add a big wide panel of the contrast
| fabric, now that I've figured out how to restyle the bodice so it
| won't look patchy.

I have another idea for you that may work out.....

Why not make a completely new straight skirt out of the contrast fabric. Then open one of
the seams on the old one and add a tie to the top. You could wear it over the new skirt
as a peplum, or wear just the new skirt alone with the top. This way you would get to
looks for the price of one.
--
Hugs,
Lynn


*strip CLOTHES to reply*
Homepage:
http://members.shaw.ca/sewfinefashions/
See my boys: http://photos.yahoo.com/bc/papavince_29/



 




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