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^10 - light reduction glazes



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 30th 06, 03:44 AM posted to rec.crafts.pottery
5string
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Posts: 12
Default ^10 - light reduction glazes

I recently switched studios from one that did ^10 heavy-reduction to one
that does ^10 light-reduction. I tried a bunch of test tiles using glazes
from my previous studio (i.e., heavy reduction) and the results were (not
unexpectantly) disappointing. So..., any suggestions for some ^10 glazes
that do well with light reduction? Thanks.

Rick


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  #2  
Old September 30th 06, 04:08 PM posted to rec.crafts.pottery
DKat
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Posts: 141
Default ^10 - light reduction glazes

I am assuming that the studio itself does not have glazes that you like. It
would help to know what you find attractive. I would stay away from copper
glazes because what you will be getting is a mix of green to gag me blood
liver. Iron glazes can still work nicely but it depends on what you are
looking for with them. Celedon (iron) will be tricky. Most cobalt glazes
will still give you the same blue (lavender/purple) regardless of the
reduction. Rutile will still do beautiful things regardless of the
reduction level.

Can you tell us what glazes you like (at least what oxides are in them),
what color it is that you like. Reduction is going to vary with location in
the kiln. If you are allowed to help load, find out where the high
reductions spots are and put your pots with glazes that require reduction in
those places (I would still avoid copper glazes though). The problem with
light reduction is that glazes formulated to look reduced in oxidation
firings generally don't work well in reduction.

Sorry, mostly thinking out loud here.

Go to the list server
http://lsv.ceramics.org/scripts/wa.exe?A0=CLAYART

They have a larger population. You can also do a search - just discovered
their search link is broken so go here.

http://www.potters.org/search.htm

I came up with this one for example.

"Here's a reliable Cone 10 glossy oribe that is a lovely jade green
breaking
to blue where thick:

FLINT 24.66%
WHITING 21.83%
CUSTER (POTASH) FELDSPAR 30.12%
EPK 12.28%
TALC 7.6%
BONE ASH 1.07%
COPPER OXIDE BLACK 2.44%

We get lovely color in atmospheres from neutral to light reduction (heavy
reduction is not necessary).

A very reliable glaze!

Ellen Baker, Orion
"



Good luck,
Donna

"5string" wrote in message
...
I recently switched studios from one that did ^10 heavy-reduction to one
that does ^10 light-reduction. I tried a bunch of test tiles using glazes
from my previous studio (i.e., heavy reduction) and the results were (not
unexpectantly) disappointing. So..., any suggestions for some ^10 glazes
that do well with light reduction? Thanks.

Rick



  #3  
Old September 30th 06, 08:13 PM posted to rec.crafts.pottery
5string
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default ^10 - light reduction glazes

Donna, thanks for the "thinking out loud" comments. At the studio I used to
be at, which was a community studio, we used a variety of glazes such as
yellow salt, leach white, cd black, cobalt green, copper red, tomato red,
green and amber celedons, coleman purple, temmoku, gold shino, a plain
shino, slate blue, blue jeans, and a couple others glazes which I cannot
immediately recall.

In our recent test batch (at the "new" studio), the leach white, cd black,
temmoku, blue jeans, and cobalt greens turned out ok, but all the other
glazes turned out rather dismal. These results were not unexpected, but we
wanted to try them anyways. The studio owner put the tiles in the part(s)
of the kiln where he thought there was greater amounts of reductions.

The "new" studio uses a lot of bone ash glazes and tends to airbrush/spray
his glazes on his pieces. In the past, I have either dipped or on occasion
painted my glazes on my pieces. I am hoping to develop my own color palette
but do not have a lot of experience with glaze chemistry or glaze mixing. I
recently started reading John Britt's "High-Fire Glazes," but was interested
in what others experienced with glazes formulated for light-reduction.
(i.e., what works well, and what does not; what to stay away from; etc....)

I guess in other words, I liked some of the brighter colors like copper red,
coleman purple, blue jeans, etc..., but know that they will no longer work
the same way. So...

Thanks.

Rick


  #4  
Old October 1st 06, 02:38 PM posted to rec.crafts.pottery
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default ^10 - light reduction glazes


5string wrote:
I recently switched studios from one that did ^10 heavy-reduction to one
that does ^10 light-reduction. I tried a bunch of test tiles using glazes
from my previous studio (i.e., heavy reduction) and the results were (not
unexpectantly) disappointing. So..., any suggestions for some ^10 glazes
that do well with light reduction? Thanks.

Rick

A lot depends on how light is their light reduction. In general, all
the cobalt blues should do fine, and the rutile blues may work as well,
particularly if you put them in the areas of the kiln that get the best
reduction. They will be deeper, more intense in color with more
reduction.
Copper greens like Oribe, Ayumi,Willie Helix, can do well in light
reduction, but you should do a bunch of test tiles and put them
throughout the kiln to find out where they work best.
The Kakis like Tomato Red should work and tenmokus may be OK in light
reduction. The Mashiko type brownish reds may work as well.
The celadons usually need more reduction; but I would choose a celadon
that goes blue in oxidation as opposed to one that goes yellow. That
way, even if it doesn't reduce you get a color that is useable and
saleable. If you're lucky you might get the robins egg blue color with
flashes of red.
The barium yellows need good reduction to develop color, so I would
probably avoid those. All whites and oatmeals and light tans should do
fine.
Instead of copper reds, you might want to try a chrome/tin red in the
most oxidizing part of the kiln (probably the lowest part of the kiln
toward the front), It might work. Again, it depends on when and how
much they are reducing.
Ash glazes and fake ash glazes should work as well.
Some people only reduce early to get body reduction and keep the firing
neutral till the end when they do a bit more reduction. So, not knowing
their schedule, the best advice I can give is to make a bunch of test
tiles and put them in various parts of the kiln to see if they will
work for you and where they might work. You may find that the same
oribe will be fine on the lower shelf, in front but may go a bit liver
red in the hotter, more reducing parts of the kiln.

Regards,
June
http://www.angelfire.com/art2/shambhalapottery/

  #5  
Old October 1st 06, 06:57 PM posted to rec.crafts.pottery
steve [email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 43
Default ^10 - light reduction glazes

laguna clay sells turquiose matt which is some barium-bone ash thing
that works well across several cones & reduction levels. it results in
a corroded copper time verdigris.

i've noticed tenmoku as a base glaze with rutile red or blue over it
works very well.

fire hot? find the hot spot in that kiln & try to sit your pieces
there?

see ya

steve



wrote:
5string wrote:
I recently switched studios from one that did ^10 heavy-reduction to one
that does ^10 light-reduction. I tried a bunch of test tiles using glazes
from my previous studio (i.e., heavy reduction) and the results were (not
unexpectantly) disappointing. So..., any suggestions for some ^10 glazes
that do well with light reduction? Thanks.

Rick

A lot depends on how light is their light reduction. In general, all
the cobalt blues should do fine, and the rutile blues may work as well,
particularly if you put them in the areas of the kiln that get the best
reduction. They will be deeper, more intense in color with more
reduction.
Copper greens like Oribe, Ayumi,Willie Helix, can do well in light
reduction, but you should do a bunch of test tiles and put them
throughout the kiln to find out where they work best.
The Kakis like Tomato Red should work and tenmokus may be OK in light
reduction. The Mashiko type brownish reds may work as well.
The celadons usually need more reduction; but I would choose a celadon
that goes blue in oxidation as opposed to one that goes yellow. That
way, even if it doesn't reduce you get a color that is useable and
saleable. If you're lucky you might get the robins egg blue color with
flashes of red.
The barium yellows need good reduction to develop color, so I would
probably avoid those. All whites and oatmeals and light tans should do
fine.
Instead of copper reds, you might want to try a chrome/tin red in the
most oxidizing part of the kiln (probably the lowest part of the kiln
toward the front), It might work. Again, it depends on when and how
much they are reducing.
Ash glazes and fake ash glazes should work as well.
Some people only reduce early to get body reduction and keep the firing
neutral till the end when they do a bit more reduction. So, not knowing
their schedule, the best advice I can give is to make a bunch of test
tiles and put them in various parts of the kiln to see if they will
work for you and where they might work. You may find that the same
oribe will be fine on the lower shelf, in front but may go a bit liver
red in the hotter, more reducing parts of the kiln.

Regards,
June
http://www.angelfire.com/art2/shambhalapottery/

  #6  
Old October 3rd 06, 06:03 AM posted to rec.crafts.pottery
Russell Andavall
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default ^10 - light reduction glazes

5string wrote:
I recently switched studios from one that did ^10 heavy-reduction to one
that does ^10 light-reduction. I tried a bunch of test tiles using glazes
from my previous studio (i.e., heavy reduction) and the results were (not
unexpectantly) disappointing. So..., any suggestions for some ^10 glazes
that do well with light reduction? Thanks.

Rick


You might try introducing some silicon carbide triple fine grain to the
glaze for local reduction... This stuff is very reactive and heavy.. so
use only a small percent (1/4 % to 1%) and mix the glaze very well and
use it immediately...
Russ Andavall
 




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