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Kiln question



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 17th 04, 03:25 PM
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Kiln question

Hello all,
I've read similar postings over the past few years, but I guess I didn't pay
attention to the answers well enough. I've got a kiln that I can't get into
my house. It's been on my front porch wrapped in plastic, lowering property
values for a year now, becasue I'm not sure what to do. I could get it into
my back porch and I'm trying to figure out the feasibility of putting it
there.

First, the back porch is a wooden structure, about 8 feet wide and 5 feet
deep, with the adjoining wall to the house being made of brick. I could run
the wiring through to this wall. The advantage, is of course that venting
would be easy, it's not actually in the house. Disadvantages, this is
Canada and it regularly goes to -20 or -30 in the winter. So, how realistic
is this, what kind of insulation would be required to deal with the fact
that it's made of wood, what kind of clearance from wooden walls is needed
to keep it safe? etc.

I know people have commented on similar questions in the past and I'm
wondering if you'd mind repeating your advice! Thanks in advance.
Simon


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  #2  
Old May 17th 04, 05:37 PM
Charles Spitzer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


wrote in message
.. .
Hello all,
I've read similar postings over the past few years, but I guess I didn't

pay
attention to the answers well enough. I've got a kiln that I can't get

into
my house. It's been on my front porch wrapped in plastic, lowering

property
values for a year now, becasue I'm not sure what to do. I could get it

into
my back porch and I'm trying to figure out the feasibility of putting it
there.

First, the back porch is a wooden structure, about 8 feet wide and 5 feet
deep, with the adjoining wall to the house being made of brick. I could

run
the wiring through to this wall. The advantage, is of course that venting
would be easy, it's not actually in the house. Disadvantages, this is
Canada and it regularly goes to -20 or -30 in the winter. So, how

realistic
is this, what kind of insulation would be required to deal with the fact
that it's made of wood, what kind of clearance from wooden walls is needed
to keep it safe? etc.


about 18" seperation. you could put up durock (cement board) to protect it.
don't forget the floor.

I know people have commented on similar questions in the past and I'm
wondering if you'd mind repeating your advice! Thanks in advance.
Simon



  #3  
Old May 17th 04, 10:47 PM
annemarie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Do you have a garage? Having it outside could be a problem, the colder
temperatures could make it more difficult to reach your required temp. You
would be using much more electricity and even bunged it is making your kiln
work a lot harder. I am in New Zealand and have my kiln in my garage and
even here (moderate climate) I notice the kiln takes longer on a cold 10C
winters day. I close the garage doors and it does make a difference. Yes I
am in Wellington and wind is an issue sometimes.
Could you build a small shed to house it? Here in NZ anyway small garden
sheds are pretty cheap.
Good luck
Annemarie

"Charles Spitzer" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
.. .
Hello all,
I've read similar postings over the past few years, but I guess I didn't

pay
attention to the answers well enough. I've got a kiln that I can't get

into
my house. It's been on my front porch wrapped in plastic, lowering

property
values for a year now, becasue I'm not sure what to do. I could get it

into
my back porch and I'm trying to figure out the feasibility of putting it
there.

First, the back porch is a wooden structure, about 8 feet wide and 5

feet
deep, with the adjoining wall to the house being made of brick. I could

run
the wiring through to this wall. The advantage, is of course that

venting
would be easy, it's not actually in the house. Disadvantages, this is
Canada and it regularly goes to -20 or -30 in the winter. So, how

realistic
is this, what kind of insulation would be required to deal with the fact
that it's made of wood, what kind of clearance from wooden walls is

needed
to keep it safe? etc.


about 18" seperation. you could put up durock (cement board) to protect

it.
don't forget the floor.

I know people have commented on similar questions in the past and I'm
wondering if you'd mind repeating your advice! Thanks in advance.
Simon





  #4  
Old May 17th 04, 11:30 PM
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks for the response. Yeah, sorry, back porch might be a regionalism -
it's an extension of the house at the back where all the garbage that
doesn't fit in the basement goes. It's totally closed off, has windows,
shares one wall and a door to the house, so probably isn't as cold as the
outside. Underneath it is the storm cellar - a few steps down to bare earth
that then opens into the basement. The only thing is that it isn't heated
or insulated. So it's probably even better than a garden shed in that
regard. Not sure how much extra electricity it would take to fire it up in
cold weather - it's a 7' cubic electric kiln, quite old, so probably takes a
lot to start with.
Simon
"annemarie" wrote in message
...
Do you have a garage? Having it outside could be a problem, the colder
temperatures could make it more difficult to reach your required temp. You
would be using much more electricity and even bunged it is making your

kiln
work a lot harder. I am in New Zealand and have my kiln in my garage and
even here (moderate climate) I notice the kiln takes longer on a cold 10C
winters day. I close the garage doors and it does make a difference. Yes

I
am in Wellington and wind is an issue sometimes.
Could you build a small shed to house it? Here in NZ anyway small garden
sheds are pretty cheap.
Good luck
Annemarie

"Charles Spitzer" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
.. .
Hello all,
I've read similar postings over the past few years, but I guess I

didn't
pay
attention to the answers well enough. I've got a kiln that I can't

get
into
my house. It's been on my front porch wrapped in plastic, lowering

property
values for a year now, becasue I'm not sure what to do. I could get

it
into
my back porch and I'm trying to figure out the feasibility of putting

it
there.

First, the back porch is a wooden structure, about 8 feet wide and 5

feet
deep, with the adjoining wall to the house being made of brick. I

could
run
the wiring through to this wall. The advantage, is of course that

venting
would be easy, it's not actually in the house. Disadvantages, this is
Canada and it regularly goes to -20 or -30 in the winter. So, how

realistic
is this, what kind of insulation would be required to deal with the

fact
that it's made of wood, what kind of clearance from wooden walls is

needed
to keep it safe? etc.


about 18" seperation. you could put up durock (cement board) to protect

it.
don't forget the floor.

I know people have commented on similar questions in the past and I'm
wondering if you'd mind repeating your advice! Thanks in advance.
Simon







  #5  
Old May 18th 04, 07:13 AM
annemarie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


wrote in message
. ..
Thanks for the response. Yeah, sorry, back porch might be a regionalism -
it's an extension of the house at the back where all the garbage that
doesn't fit in the basement goes. It's totally closed off, has windows,
shares one wall and a door to the house, so probably isn't as cold as the
outside. Underneath it is the storm cellar - a few steps down to bare

earth
that then opens into the basement. The only thing is that it isn't heated
or insulated. So it's probably even better than a garden shed in that
regard. Not sure how much extra electricity it would take to fire it up

in
cold weather - it's a 7' cubic electric kiln, quite old, so probably takes

a
lot to start with.
Simon


Well all I can say is that here in NZ it would be fine. With your
temperatures?? Yeah I am sure it will be ok but might just take a bit more
electricity and a little longer. You would have to compensate your firing
to take that into consideration. The cone reached is about heat work, not
temperature reached. So you can fire lower and soak for a while and it will
reach a higher cone. Thus if you just take longer to gain your temperature
it will also give more heat work. You would be wise to have cones in every
firing to see how the outside temperature was affecting your kiln.
Good luck
Annemarie


  #6  
Old May 18th 04, 09:30 AM
Monika Schleidt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



wrote:

Hello all,
I've read similar postings over the past few years, but I guess I didn't pay
attention to the answers well enough. I've got a kiln that I can't get into
my house. It's been on my front porch wrapped in plastic, lowering property
values for a year now, becasue I'm not sure what to do. I could get it into
my back porch and I'm trying to figure out the feasibility of putting it
there.

First, the back porch is a wooden structure, about 8 feet wide and 5 feet
deep, with the adjoining wall to the house being made of brick. I could run
the wiring through to this wall. The advantage, is of course that venting
would be easy, it's not actually in the house. Disadvantages, this is
Canada and it regularly goes to -20 or -30 in the winter. So, how realistic
is this, what kind of insulation would be required to deal with the fact
that it's made of wood, what kind of clearance from wooden walls is needed
to keep it safe? etc.

I know people have commented on similar questions in the past and I'm
wondering if you'd mind repeating your advice! Thanks in advance.
Simon




I live in Austria and we get pretty cold winters here, my kiln, also
about 7 cubic foot, is in a kind of leanto to my workshop (an old
pigsty), which has a roof and some walls, but no windows, just large
openings. So the kiln is practically outside. I fire it all year, it is
a pain to load it in winter, because it is so cold. My kiln has a
special button which tells me the kwh it uses for each firing, it uses
more, if there is more in it, but i have not noticed a difference
between winter and summer. If you think of how hot it fires, (i fire to
about 1100C) i don't think those 20 or so degrees at the beginning
will make any difference to your electric bill.

Monika

--
Monika Schleidt

www.schleidt.org/mskeramik
(If you wish to send me a mail, please leave out the number after my name!)

  #7  
Old May 18th 04, 10:38 PM
annemarie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Monika Schleidt" wrote in message
...


wrote:

Hello all,
I've read similar postings over the past few years, but I guess I didn't

pay
attention to the answers well enough. I've got a kiln that I can't get

into
my house. It's been on my front porch wrapped in plastic, lowering

property
values for a year now, becasue I'm not sure what to do. I could get it

into
my back porch and I'm trying to figure out the feasibility of putting it
there.

First, the back porch is a wooden structure, about 8 feet wide and 5 feet
deep, with the adjoining wall to the house being made of brick. I could

run
the wiring through to this wall. The advantage, is of course that

venting
would be easy, it's not actually in the house. Disadvantages, this is
Canada and it regularly goes to -20 or -30 in the winter. So, how

realistic
is this, what kind of insulation would be required to deal with the fact
that it's made of wood, what kind of clearance from wooden walls is

needed
to keep it safe? etc.

I know people have commented on similar questions in the past and I'm
wondering if you'd mind repeating your advice! Thanks in advance.
Simon




I live in Austria and we get pretty cold winters here, my kiln, also
about 7 cubic foot, is in a kind of leanto to my workshop (an old
pigsty), which has a roof and some walls, but no windows, just large
openings. So the kiln is practically outside. I fire it all year, it is
a pain to load it in winter, because it is so cold. My kiln has a
special button which tells me the kwh it uses for each firing, it uses
more, if there is more in it, but i have not noticed a difference
between winter and summer. If you think of how hot it fires, (i fire to
about 1100C) i don't think those 20 or so degrees at the beginning
will make any difference to your electric bill.

Monika

--
Monika Schleidt

www.schleidt.org/mskeramik
(If you wish to send me a mail, please leave out the number after my

name!)


Wow your kiln must be very well insulated. Mine is in that at high temps
the outside is warm but not hot, yet in winter it takes longer to reach
temp, just has to work harder I guess. We notice it at the art centre as
well and kilns there are in a fairly insulated buildling. They sure to warm
the room up.


  #8  
Old May 21st 04, 03:11 PM
Kathryn & Stuart Fields
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

If you're in Northern Canada, the cold staying for weeks, have you
considered spray foam insulating the walls around the kiln area at least.
We use this in the Mojave desert (weeks of 120F and lots and lots of wind).
Makes a huge difference in our shop which is large enough so there is no
real heating or cooling available. Ours was done nearly 30 years ago and is
still working fine with no maintenance. Sorry, I don't know where my
husband got the material, he says it was from a private contractor. You
might check with any contractor in your area.

Kathy
wrote in message
. ..
Thanks for the response. Yeah, sorry, back porch might be a regionalism -
it's an extension of the house at the back where all the garbage that
doesn't fit in the basement goes. It's totally closed off, has windows,
shares one wall and a door to the house, so probably isn't as cold as the
outside. Underneath it is the storm cellar - a few steps down to bare

earth
that then opens into the basement. The only thing is that it isn't heated
or insulated. So it's probably even better than a garden shed in that
regard. Not sure how much extra electricity it would take to fire it up

in
cold weather - it's a 7' cubic electric kiln, quite old, so probably takes

a
lot to start with.
Simon
"annemarie" wrote in message
...
Do you have a garage? Having it outside could be a problem, the colder
temperatures could make it more difficult to reach your required temp.

You
would be using much more electricity and even bunged it is making your

kiln
work a lot harder. I am in New Zealand and have my kiln in my garage

and
even here (moderate climate) I notice the kiln takes longer on a cold

10C
winters day. I close the garage doors and it does make a difference.

Yes
I
am in Wellington and wind is an issue sometimes.
Could you build a small shed to house it? Here in NZ anyway small

garden
sheds are pretty cheap.
Good luck
Annemarie

"Charles Spitzer" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
.. .
Hello all,
I've read similar postings over the past few years, but I guess I

didn't
pay
attention to the answers well enough. I've got a kiln that I can't

get
into
my house. It's been on my front porch wrapped in plastic, lowering
property
values for a year now, becasue I'm not sure what to do. I could get

it
into
my back porch and I'm trying to figure out the feasibility of

putting
it
there.

First, the back porch is a wooden structure, about 8 feet wide and 5

feet
deep, with the adjoining wall to the house being made of brick. I

could
run
the wiring through to this wall. The advantage, is of course that

venting
would be easy, it's not actually in the house. Disadvantages, this

is
Canada and it regularly goes to -20 or -30 in the winter. So, how
realistic
is this, what kind of insulation would be required to deal with the

fact
that it's made of wood, what kind of clearance from wooden walls is

needed
to keep it safe? etc.

about 18" seperation. you could put up durock (cement board) to

protect
it.
don't forget the floor.

I know people have commented on similar questions in the past and

I'm
wondering if you'd mind repeating your advice! Thanks in advance.
Simon









 




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