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Moth help!



 
 
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  #11  
Old July 3rd 07, 12:12 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
Mirjam Bruck-Cohen
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Posts: 1,592
Default Moth help!

Naphtaline is a Poison that accumulates in your body ,, it does smell
bad anf harms you ,,,
mirjam
mirjam

crikey, that's awful!! I'd be using napthalene- smelly and toxic but it
does work... and the smell does air out. If you can't/won't use napthalene,
cedar might work. I have read that all the herbal things like lavender only
mask the smell of the fibre, they don't actually repel moths, just hide your
wool from their little mothy noses. Cedar may be an exception to this.

Oh, and light, moths hate light. So store your most precious things out of
the darkness.

Taueret


--
NSW, Australia
http://taueret.typepad.com

"Mary Fisher" wrote in message

Does anyone know of any home moth-proofing system?




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  #12  
Old July 3rd 07, 12:12 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
Mary Fisher
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Posts: 741
Default Moth help!


"Bernadette" wrote in message
news

Your garden (and son's) sounds like mine. I have lavender, sage, thyme,
rosemary, parsley, lovage, bay leaves, tarragon and nasturtiums (so far)
and I'm always open to suggestions for other herbs if I'm likely to use
them. :-)


I can't grow tarragon, no room for lovage. Son began growing vegetables this
year - what a rotten year to start! But last night he said that they were
gonig to enjoy his first cauliflower - which I gave him - and the curds on
mine are all blackened by rain :-(

Don't yu have marjoram? Mint? Calendula? Trying to think of what else
herb-wise is in our garden ...

Mary


  #13  
Old July 3rd 07, 12:12 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
Mary Fisher
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Posts: 741
Default Moth help!


"hesira" wrote in message
ps.com...
On Jul 2, 2:11 pm, "Mary Fisher" wrote:

Does anyone know of any home moth-proofing system?

Mary


Have you ever tried cedar chips or balls?


No - does it work?

What I was really thinking of was a treatment for yarn rather than just in
storage.

Mary


  #14  
Old July 3rd 07, 12:14 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
Mary Fisher
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Posts: 741
Default Moth help!


"Katherine" wrote in message
ups.com...
On Jul 2, 4:11 pm, "Mary Fisher" wrote:
Today I took out a shawl which a daughter knitted for me some years ago
from
her own spun Hebridean black wool from the two Heb ewe lambs I gave her.
She'd chosen the stitch 'candlelight' because I made beeswax candles.

It had huge holes in it and it's unsalvageable.

Does anyone know of any home moth-proofing system?

Obviously it will be for future items but we'd hate it to happen again.
We're both very unhappy (Spouse and I - I haven't told daughter yet).


My Rubbermaid containers keep moths out. I also have a cedar chest in
which I keep very SPECIAL things.
I am so sorry you lost the shawl. It must have been VERY special to
you.
Maybe if you cry softly when you tell your daughter, she will make
you
another one???


She has a sick husband, a two year old and a farm now, she only had the farm
when she did it and her husband helped with it. I couldn't expect her to
make another.

But I might make her a pi shawl when I get the book :-)

Mary
I must have a look for that stitch.



  #15  
Old July 3rd 07, 12:15 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
Mary Fisher
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Posts: 741
Default Moth help!


"Taueret" wrote in message
...
crikey, that's awful!! I'd be using napthalene- smelly and toxic but it
does work... and the smell does air out. If you can't/won't use
napthalene, cedar might work. I have read that all the herbal things like
lavender only mask the smell of the fibre, they don't actually repel
moths, just hide your wool from their little mothy noses. Cedar may be an
exception to this.

Oh, and light, moths hate light. So store your most precious things out
of the darkness.

Taueret


Thanks, the shawl was in the dark.

I still haven't told her ...

Mary


  #16  
Old July 3rd 07, 12:17 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
Mary Fisher
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Posts: 741
Default Moth help!


"Richard Eney" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Mary Fisher wrote:
snip
Does anyone know of any home moth-proofing system?


Do you have a microwave oven and a freezer?
If you want to be sure something is insect-free, first
microwave it for 1 minute, then freeze it for a day or so,
warm it (in a sealed container) to let eggs hatch, and then
microwave it again.


No microwave but I have put fleeces and skins in the freezer as well as
yarn, just never thought about clothes :-(

The advice others have given will help too, but the
best solution I've found is Ziploc[TM] bags or the equivalent
in self-seal plastic. Tupperware{TM} is ideal because their
plastic formula doesn't emit chemicals that plasticize the
contents, and the seal keeps out moisture. It keeps out most
bugs (but flour weevils can chew right through it if they're
already in the flour). Some other companies licensed the
Tupperware systems. Beware of containers that only seem to
seal but have airholes hidden under the handles; they're no
help against moths and carpet beetles.


I know :-) I keep woolen blankets and period clothing in such bags, just
never thought about other things. I can see that I'm going to have to have a
blitz on my clothes, such a shame but it must happen.

Mary

=Tamar



  #17  
Old July 3rd 07, 12:28 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
Mary Fisher
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Posts: 741
Default Moth help!


"Olwyn Mary" wrote in message
.. .

IMO the best way is to keep things out and aired.


You're right.


I have one beautiful shawl (among several others) which I inherited from
dh's aunt, and I make sure I wear it at least once every couple of months.


I just don't have that kind of life ... I wore it when we visited them and
then it was forgotten about.

Mea culpa.

Mary


  #18  
Old July 3rd 07, 01:49 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
DA[_2_]
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Posts: 72
Default Moth help!


Does anyone know of any home moth-proofing system?

Obviously it will be for future items but we'd hate it to happen again.
We're both very unhappy (Spouse and I - I haven't told daughter yet).

Mary


The type of moth which attacks fiber is attracted by smell. Anything which
masks the "wool smell" will deter them. Cedar or lavender are traditional
repellents, cloves or cinnamon work equally as well. Boric acid powder
sprinkled on the fiber will kill the larva.
Sorry to hear such a priceless gift was ruined.
DA


  #19  
Old July 3rd 07, 03:23 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
Olwyn Mary
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Posts: 459
Default Moth help!

Mary Fisher wrote:

I just don't have that kind of life ... I wore it when we visited them and
then it was forgotten about.

Mea culpa.

Mary


Whaddya mean, you don't have that kind of life? USE your pretties,
don't be like those old folk who considered everything "too nice to use"
I have a shawl on the back of my favorite tv watching chair, and if
there is a slight draft I just reach back and pull it round my
shoulders. I have a bunch more of which I take one practically
everywhere, whether I am going to church or a restaurant or wherever -
so much easier to slip on and off than fighting my way into a cardigan.

On the same line, I inherited a bunch of embroidered pillowcases from my
mother and grandmother. Guess what? They are all in the linen closet
and get used in rotation. Likewise, when our daughter was 17 and our
son 20, I decided we were going to use the hand-embroidered and/or lace
table linens every day, not just Sundays, and enjoy them. So what if
they fall apart eventually? They were OUR wedding presents, made for us
with love by various female relatives. I know that neither my daughter
nor my daughter in law will ever iron them, so I will enjoy them while I
have them. We also use the good silver cutlery everyday, in fact the
only thing still saved for Sundays is the antique bone china and that is
because dh, after a lifetime of drawing plans, has some arthritis in his
fingers and does not trust himself not to drop it. I am running a home
here, not curating a museum.

I reiterate. USE your "good stuff".

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans.

--
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  #20  
Old July 3rd 07, 04:42 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
Mary Fisher
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Posts: 741
Default Moth help!


"Olwyn Mary" wrote in message
.. .
Mary Fisher wrote:

I just don't have that kind of life ... I wore it when we visited them
and then it was forgotten about.

Mea culpa.

Mary


Whaddya mean, you don't have that kind of life? USE your pretties, don't
be like those old folk who considered everything "too nice to use"


Oh it's not that, I'm just usually too busy doing things which don't lend
themselves to pretty clothes :-)

I have a shawl on the back of my favorite tv watching chair,


don't have a tv ...

and if there is a slight draft I just reach back and pull it round my
shoulders.


Don't have draughts (sorry for English spelling), in fact this is such a
warm house because of insulation that we rarely wear anything over our
shirts.

I have a bunch more of which I take one practically everywhere, whether I
am going to church or a restaurant or wherever - so much easier to slip on
and off than fighting my way into a cardigan.


Don't wear cardigans either :-) A pretty shawl doesn't lend itself to
wearing on a scooter pillion when we go out ...

On the same line, I inherited a bunch of embroidered pillowcases from my
mother and grandmother. Guess what? They are all in the linen closet and
get used in rotation.


Oh I'd use those! I bought some fine linen ones with beautiful edgings from
a charity stall and love them, they're very thin in parts now so I'll have
to make the best parts into handkerchiefs. I love linen. The woman who sold
me them was delighted, she said they'd been her auntie's and the old lady
would love to know they were appreciated. Pity the niece didn't want them,
she thought they were too much trouble!

Likewise, when our daughter was 17 and our son 20, I decided we were going
to use the hand-embroidered and/or lace table linens every day, not just
Sundays, and enjoy them.


We do that too, I'm still using linen tablecloths I embroidered as a
teenager for my bottom drawer, recently I finished embroidering one which
last saw the light when I was in labour with our fifth and last child. He
was 38 this year ...

So what if they fall apart eventually?


They're made into hankies!

They were OUR wedding presents, made for us with love by various female
relatives. I know that neither my daughter nor my daughter in law will
ever iron them,


I wonder why that is? I love ironing linen, making it not just crease-free
by so smooth and shiny ...

so I will enjoy them while I have them. We also use the good silver
cutlery everyday, in fact the only thing still saved for Sundays is the
antique bone china and that is because dh, after a lifetime of drawing
plans, has some arthritis in his fingers and does not trust himself not to
drop it. I am running a home here, not curating a museum.


We don't have silver cutlery not antique china - the china we have left is
more than 60 years old. The plates are used daily, the cups and saucers
(only three left) on Sunday mornings.

Our house is like a museum - every time we go to museums I see things which
we not only have but use frequently.

I reiterate. USE your "good stuff".


I do. Just not clothes. When Ann gave me the shawl I wondered what chance
I'd have to wear it. I live in jeans and men's shirts, I'm very
uncomfortable in skirts except the floor length ones I wear for period
occasions, the shawl was unsuitable for those times.

I've been looking at it again today with a view to photographing it to show
folk here but I'm just too ashamed. I can't even pull it out.

So I've begun a vigorous throw-out session, necessitated by someone coming
to stay with us this weekend (an American woman who I've never met). The
spare room does tend to be used as a dump.

But no more! It's squeaky clean now and the rug (a gift from another
American woman who stayed here years ago) is in the bath having a good soak,
then the colours will glow again. It's not a dirty room because it isn't
used but a dull film does seem to engulf anything which isn't used
regularly. And no, the shawl wasn't in that room but in our bedroom :-(

Mary


 




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