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Cone 6 Glazes WITHOUT Gertsley Borate?



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 16th 04, 05:47 AM
dkat
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cone 6 Glazes WITHOUT Gertsley Borate?

Just curious how people are doing on coming up with glazes without Gertsley
Borate. Does anyone have a favorite out of the "Mastering Cone 6 Glazes"
book? All of the glazes we use in the studio I have worked in are based on
the various Gertsley formulas. The glazes I like are the Randy's Red,
Honey, and the copper glazes that can't be used on the inside of pots
(Pennels with Erins green)...

I have just bought an electric kiln and have "Mastering Cone 6 Glazes" . I
was schooled in reduction ^8-10 and am more than a tad nervous about the
whole endeavor of oxidation firings at cone 6. To me even the Gertsley
Borate glazes often look flat with oxidation ^6. My favorite glazes that I
learned on were Albany slip with rutile oxide decorations, the iron based
celadon when it went blue sea green, and Shino. I do not want to carry on
the error of using GB. I'm working in a very small space and don't really
want to buy more that a half dozen bags of ingredients. In any case I can't
seem to kick start myself into beginning. I find that even though I used to
make up our glazes for reduction firings that I don't know what silica to
use for the base glazes out of MC6G... We never used silica as the
ingredient "Silica" and my catalogs don't have anything listed in that form
that appears to be a glaze ingredient. Now I have given much more
information that anyone cares to read or is interested in..... Mostly I'm
looking for some kind of nudge to get me in gear.


Ads
  #2  
Old July 16th 04, 11:51 AM
A&V
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi dkat,
I have started playing with cone six glazes by adjusting my favourite cone
10 glazes... however, I was always firing oxidation, so it was a bit easier.
Anyway, If you add 10% frit 4108 ( used to substitute gerstley borate) to
cone 10 glazes, you are likely to get simmilar glaze maturing at cone
6....as a rule of thumb... or replace potash feldspar with soda feldspar.
I tend to avoid gerstley as it is water soluable and tends to spitt off pots
during firing.
Andrea
"dkat" wrote in message
. ..
Just curious how people are doing on coming up with glazes without

Gertsley
Borate. Does anyone have a favorite out of the "Mastering Cone 6 Glazes"
book? All of the glazes we use in the studio I have worked in are based

on
the various Gertsley formulas. The glazes I like are the Randy's Red,
Honey, and the copper glazes that can't be used on the inside of pots
(Pennels with Erins green)...

I have just bought an electric kiln and have "Mastering Cone 6 Glazes" .

I
was schooled in reduction ^8-10 and am more than a tad nervous about the
whole endeavor of oxidation firings at cone 6. To me even the Gertsley
Borate glazes often look flat with oxidation ^6. My favorite glazes that

I
learned on were Albany slip with rutile oxide decorations, the iron based
celadon when it went blue sea green, and Shino. I do not want to carry on
the error of using GB. I'm working in a very small space and don't really
want to buy more that a half dozen bags of ingredients. In any case I

can't
seem to kick start myself into beginning. I find that even though I used

to
make up our glazes for reduction firings that I don't know what silica to
use for the base glazes out of MC6G... We never used silica as the
ingredient "Silica" and my catalogs don't have anything listed in that

form
that appears to be a glaze ingredient. Now I have given much more
information that anyone cares to read or is interested in..... Mostly I'm
looking for some kind of nudge to get me in gear.




  #3  
Old July 16th 04, 01:50 PM
Bert Gibson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi dkat,

That's how I started. Frustrated with the firing results at school, I bought
an electric kiln and "MC6G". Before that I had never mixed glazes or fired a
kiln. It took alot of work and alot of trial and error but I have finally
started seeing it pay off. Since you already have experience in glazes and
firing, I am sure that you won't have the amount of issues to overcome that
I did. Check out my site for some results and let me know what you think.
Just keep in mind I have only been potting for about a year and a half.

Bert Gibson
http://home.comcast.net/~lazybpottery/





"dkat" wrote in message
. ..
Just curious how people are doing on coming up with glazes without

Gertsley
Borate. Does anyone have a favorite out of the "Mastering Cone 6 Glazes"
book? All of the glazes we use in the studio I have worked in are based

on
the various Gertsley formulas. The glazes I like are the Randy's Red,
Honey, and the copper glazes that can't be used on the inside of pots
(Pennels with Erins green)...

I have just bought an electric kiln and have "Mastering Cone 6 Glazes" .

I
was schooled in reduction ^8-10 and am more than a tad nervous about the
whole endeavor of oxidation firings at cone 6. To me even the Gertsley
Borate glazes often look flat with oxidation ^6. My favorite glazes that

I
learned on were Albany slip with rutile oxide decorations, the iron based
celadon when it went blue sea green, and Shino. I do not want to carry on
the error of using GB. I'm working in a very small space and don't really
want to buy more that a half dozen bags of ingredients. In any case I

can't
seem to kick start myself into beginning. I find that even though I used

to
make up our glazes for reduction firings that I don't know what silica to
use for the base glazes out of MC6G... We never used silica as the
ingredient "Silica" and my catalogs don't have anything listed in that

form
that appears to be a glaze ingredient. Now I have given much more
information that anyone cares to read or is interested in..... Mostly I'm
looking for some kind of nudge to get me in gear.




  #4  
Old July 16th 04, 02:57 PM
dkat
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thank you. Yes, the gerstley spitting off of pots is a serious issue that
many people are not aware of at all. We just lost an entire kiln load of
pieces, all of the shelves and the sitter because the Honey glaze from a
piece spit onto the sitter and kept it from shutting off (at least this is
what I was told).
"A&V" wrote in message
...
Hi dkat,
I have started playing with cone six glazes by adjusting my favourite cone
10 glazes... however, I was always firing oxidation, so it was a bit

easier.
Anyway, If you add 10% frit 4108 ( used to substitute gerstley borate) to
cone 10 glazes, you are likely to get simmilar glaze maturing at cone
6....as a rule of thumb... or replace potash feldspar with soda feldspar.
I tend to avoid gerstley as it is water soluable and tends to spitt off

pots
during firing.
Andrea
"dkat" wrote in message
. ..
Just curious how people are doing on coming up with glazes without

Gertsley
Borate. Does anyone have a favorite out of the "Mastering Cone 6

Glazes"
book? All of the glazes we use in the studio I have worked in are based

on
the various Gertsley formulas. The glazes I like are the Randy's Red,
Honey, and the copper glazes that can't be used on the inside of pots
(Pennels with Erins green)...

I have just bought an electric kiln and have "Mastering Cone 6 Glazes" .

I
was schooled in reduction ^8-10 and am more than a tad nervous about the
whole endeavor of oxidation firings at cone 6. To me even the Gertsley
Borate glazes often look flat with oxidation ^6. My favorite glazes

that
I
learned on were Albany slip with rutile oxide decorations, the iron

based
celadon when it went blue sea green, and Shino. I do not want to carry

on
the error of using GB. I'm working in a very small space and don't

really
want to buy more that a half dozen bags of ingredients. In any case I

can't
seem to kick start myself into beginning. I find that even though I

used
to
make up our glazes for reduction firings that I don't know what silica

to
use for the base glazes out of MC6G... We never used silica as the
ingredient "Silica" and my catalogs don't have anything listed in that

form
that appears to be a glaze ingredient. Now I have given much more
information that anyone cares to read or is interested in..... Mostly

I'm
looking for some kind of nudge to get me in gear.






  #5  
Old July 16th 04, 02:59 PM
dkat
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

It is not becoming for a woman of my age to feel .... well ... green with
envy and jealousy.... Those are really lovely and it is really impossible to
believe that you have just been doing this a year plus.

The reduction pieces brought back many memories.

Thank you.

"Bert Gibson" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s52...
Hi dkat,

That's how I started. Frustrated with the firing results at school, I

bought
an electric kiln and "MC6G". Before that I had never mixed glazes or fired

a
kiln. It took alot of work and alot of trial and error but I have finally
started seeing it pay off. Since you already have experience in glazes and
firing, I am sure that you won't have the amount of issues to overcome

that
I did. Check out my site for some results and let me know what you think.
Just keep in mind I have only been potting for about a year and a half.

Bert Gibson
http://home.comcast.net/~lazybpottery/





"dkat" wrote in message
. ..
Just curious how people are doing on coming up with glazes without

Gertsley
Borate. Does anyone have a favorite out of the "Mastering Cone 6

Glazes"
book? All of the glazes we use in the studio I have worked in are based

on
the various Gertsley formulas. The glazes I like are the Randy's Red,
Honey, and the copper glazes that can't be used on the inside of pots
(Pennels with Erins green)...

I have just bought an electric kiln and have "Mastering Cone 6 Glazes" .

I
was schooled in reduction ^8-10 and am more than a tad nervous about the
whole endeavor of oxidation firings at cone 6. To me even the Gertsley
Borate glazes often look flat with oxidation ^6. My favorite glazes

that
I
learned on were Albany slip with rutile oxide decorations, the iron

based
celadon when it went blue sea green, and Shino. I do not want to carry

on
the error of using GB. I'm working in a very small space and don't

really
want to buy more that a half dozen bags of ingredients. In any case I

can't
seem to kick start myself into beginning. I find that even though I

used
to
make up our glazes for reduction firings that I don't know what silica

to
use for the base glazes out of MC6G... We never used silica as the
ingredient "Silica" and my catalogs don't have anything listed in that

form
that appears to be a glaze ingredient. Now I have given much more
information that anyone cares to read or is interested in..... Mostly

I'm
looking for some kind of nudge to get me in gear.






  #6  
Old July 16th 04, 04:10 PM
ShantiP1
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Most cone 6 gerstley recipes, if the content is not too large, can be adjusted
for frits. Ferro frits 3124,3134 and 3195 are all boron bearing frits.
As far as glazes go you have to decide what kind of work you want to produce
and what surface and colors you think would be appropriate for that work.
You can use ash or fake ash glazes for one look, transparent glossy glazes that
can be used alone of over slips for more depth and variation is another way to
go, or matt glazes or all of the above.
Oxidation glazes can have depth by layering, using slips underneath, etc.
Any or all of the above can give you a good body of work. You just have to put
in the time and start testing.
I just finished spending several days batching glaze tests and now have over 60
tiles that I'm getting ready for firing.
You just have to be willing to put in the hard time.
You are the only one who can give yourself the jump start. The web is filled
with glaze recipes, pictures of glazes and pots, etc.
One good base glaze can give you an unlimited number of colors to choose from.
Make sketches of the pots you want to make and then decide what claybody you
want to use and what kind of glaze you would want to see on those forms and
start testing.
As far as silica, I use 200 mesh just because I feel it's a bit safer than
dealing with finer, air born, silica particles of 400 mesh. The finer mesh will
melt sooner and often it is used because if a glaze is borderline crazing the
finer silica or amorphous silica can sometimes prevent that.
I'd rather alter the expansion of the glaze in most cases rather than resorting
to using finer silica.
Lastly, I think it's a mistake to think you have to make oxidation glazes look
like cone 10 reduction glazes. There is some wonderful work coming out of cone
6 oxidation and I just think it's waste of energy to try to make it something
it isn't. At best you can only expect a poor substitute for the most part.
You can get beautiful matts at cone 6 with firing down, which permits crystal
growth.
With cone 6 oxidation you have a vast color pallette to work with and with some
creative endeavors can get interesting looking work. Maybe incoroporate more
texture in your pieces and then those transparent glazes will pool beautifully,
giving them more depth and interest.
You just have to get in there and start working.
If you're using Randy's red you might want to test it since with all that
gerstley and high iron it might leach and may not do well over time in the
dishwasher. It's a glaze that may best be saved for non functional work that
won't be subjected to the harsh environment of the chemicals in a dishwasher.
You can do a quick vinegar test by putting some vinegar in part of a shallow
dish with this glaze and let it sit a couple of days and see if it changes
color. It's not a definitive test if it doesn't; but if it does, it shows you
that it is leaching and won't be food safe or dishwasher safe.

Regards,
June Perry
http://www.angelfire.com/art2/shambhalapottery/

  #7  
Old July 16th 04, 05:42 PM
Kevin Baldwin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bert,
Just had a look at your site. Love the "Sky Blue" any chance of you sharing
the recipe with us all.
Kind Regards

Kevin.


"Bert Gibson" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s52...
Hi dkat,

That's how I started. Frustrated with the firing results at school, I

bought
an electric kiln and "MC6G". Before that I had never mixed glazes or fired

a
kiln. It took alot of work and alot of trial and error but I have finally
started seeing it pay off. Since you already have experience in glazes and
firing, I am sure that you won't have the amount of issues to overcome

that
I did. Check out my site for some results and let me know what you think.
Just keep in mind I have only been potting for about a year and a half.

Bert Gibson
http://home.comcast.net/~lazybpottery/





"dkat" wrote in message
. ..
Just curious how people are doing on coming up with glazes without

Gertsley
Borate. Does anyone have a favorite out of the "Mastering Cone 6

Glazes"
book? All of the glazes we use in the studio I have worked in are based

on
the various Gertsley formulas. The glazes I like are the Randy's Red,
Honey, and the copper glazes that can't be used on the inside of pots
(Pennels with Erins green)...

I have just bought an electric kiln and have "Mastering Cone 6 Glazes" .

I
was schooled in reduction ^8-10 and am more than a tad nervous about the
whole endeavor of oxidation firings at cone 6. To me even the Gertsley
Borate glazes often look flat with oxidation ^6. My favorite glazes

that
I
learned on were Albany slip with rutile oxide decorations, the iron

based
celadon when it went blue sea green, and Shino. I do not want to carry

on
the error of using GB. I'm working in a very small space and don't

really
want to buy more that a half dozen bags of ingredients. In any case I

can't
seem to kick start myself into beginning. I find that even though I

used
to
make up our glazes for reduction firings that I don't know what silica

to
use for the base glazes out of MC6G... We never used silica as the
ingredient "Silica" and my catalogs don't have anything listed in that

form
that appears to be a glaze ingredient. Now I have given much more
information that anyone cares to read or is interested in..... Mostly

I'm
looking for some kind of nudge to get me in gear.






  #8  
Old July 16th 04, 07:40 PM
Bert Gibson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi Kevin,
Sorry, if it were my glaze I would share, but it's not. It belong's to John
Hesselberth and Ron Roy. They asked that the recipes not be given out
because they published the book at thier own expense. They have a website
(masteringglazes.com) through which you can get it. Well worth the cost and
they have been more than generous when answering my questions. Also, "your
mileage may very" as they say. Though I followed thier formula and thier
firing schedule, my results were different then they showed in the book.

Regards,
Bert Gibson


Kevin Baldwin wrote:
Bert,
Just had a look at your site. Love the "Sky Blue" any chance of you
sharing the recipe with us all.
Kind Regards

Kevin.


"Bert Gibson" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s52...
Hi dkat,

That's how I started. Frustrated with the firing results at school,
I bought an electric kiln and "MC6G". Before that I had never mixed
glazes or fired a kiln. It took alot of work and alot of trial and
error but I have finally started seeing it pay off. Since you
already have experience in glazes and firing, I am sure that you
won't have the amount of issues to overcome that I did. Check out my
site for some results and let me know what you think. Just keep in
mind I have only been potting for about a year and a half.

Bert Gibson
http://home.comcast.net/~lazybpottery/





"dkat" wrote in message
. ..
Just curious how people are doing on coming up with glazes without
Gertsley Borate. Does anyone have a favorite out of the "Mastering
Cone 6 Glazes" book? All of the glazes we use in the studio I have
worked in are based on the various Gertsley formulas. The glazes I
like are the Randy's Red, Honey, and the copper glazes that can't
be used on the inside of pots (Pennels with Erins green)...

I have just bought an electric kiln and have "Mastering Cone 6
Glazes" . I was schooled in reduction ^8-10 and am more than a tad
nervous about the whole endeavor of oxidation firings at cone 6.
To me even the Gertsley Borate glazes often look flat with
oxidation ^6. My favorite glazes that I learned on were Albany
slip with rutile oxide decorations, the iron based celadon when it
went blue sea green, and Shino. I do not want to carry on the
error of using GB. I'm working in a very small space and don't
really want to buy more that a half dozen bags of ingredients. In
any case I can't seem to kick start myself into beginning. I find
that even though I used to make up our glazes for reduction firings
that I don't know what silica to use for the base glazes out of
MC6G... We never used silica as the ingredient "Silica" and my
catalogs don't have anything listed in that form that appears to be
a glaze ingredient. Now I have given much more information that
anyone cares to read or is interested in..... Mostly I'm looking
for some kind of nudge to get me in gear.



  #9  
Old July 16th 04, 07:57 PM
dkat
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I might add that it is a very nice book and well worth having.

"Bert Gibson" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s53...
Hi Kevin,
Sorry, if it were my glaze I would share, but it's not. It belong's to

John
Hesselberth and Ron Roy. They asked that the recipes not be given out
because they published the book at thier own expense. They have a website
(masteringglazes.com) through which you can get it. Well worth the cost

and
they have been more than generous when answering my questions. Also, "your
mileage may very" as they say. Though I followed thier formula and thier
firing schedule, my results were different then they showed in the book.

Regards,
Bert Gibson


Kevin Baldwin wrote:
Bert,
Just had a look at your site. Love the "Sky Blue" any chance of you
sharing the recipe with us all.
Kind Regards

Kevin.


"Bert Gibson" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s52...
Hi dkat,

That's how I started. Frustrated with the firing results at school,
I bought an electric kiln and "MC6G". Before that I had never mixed
glazes or fired a kiln. It took alot of work and alot of trial and
error but I have finally started seeing it pay off. Since you
already have experience in glazes and firing, I am sure that you
won't have the amount of issues to overcome that I did. Check out my
site for some results and let me know what you think. Just keep in
mind I have only been potting for about a year and a half.

Bert Gibson
http://home.comcast.net/~lazybpottery/





"dkat" wrote in message
. ..
Just curious how people are doing on coming up with glazes without
Gertsley Borate. Does anyone have a favorite out of the "Mastering
Cone 6 Glazes" book? All of the glazes we use in the studio I have
worked in are based on the various Gertsley formulas. The glazes I
like are the Randy's Red, Honey, and the copper glazes that can't
be used on the inside of pots (Pennels with Erins green)...

I have just bought an electric kiln and have "Mastering Cone 6
Glazes" . I was schooled in reduction ^8-10 and am more than a tad
nervous about the whole endeavor of oxidation firings at cone 6.
To me even the Gertsley Borate glazes often look flat with
oxidation ^6. My favorite glazes that I learned on were Albany
slip with rutile oxide decorations, the iron based celadon when it
went blue sea green, and Shino. I do not want to carry on the
error of using GB. I'm working in a very small space and don't
really want to buy more that a half dozen bags of ingredients. In
any case I can't seem to kick start myself into beginning. I find
that even though I used to make up our glazes for reduction firings
that I don't know what silica to use for the base glazes out of
MC6G... We never used silica as the ingredient "Silica" and my
catalogs don't have anything listed in that form that appears to be
a glaze ingredient. Now I have given much more information that
anyone cares to read or is interested in..... Mostly I'm looking
for some kind of nudge to get me in gear.





  #10  
Old July 16th 04, 08:23 PM
David Hewitt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

If you were to live across the Atlantic in the UK, for example, you
would never have bothered with Gertsley Borate in the first place.

If you want cone 6 glazes without this material than you will find
plenty of recipes in Mike Bailey's book 'Glazes Cone 6', some without
either Gertsley Borate or a fritt.

ISBN 0-8122-1782-9

David
In article , dkat
writes
Just curious how people are doing on coming up with glazes without Gertsley
Borate. Does anyone have a favorite out of the "Mastering Cone 6 Glazes"
book? All of the glazes we use in the studio I have worked in are based on
the various Gertsley formulas. The glazes I like are the Randy's Red,
Honey, and the copper glazes that can't be used on the inside of pots
(Pennels with Erins green)...

I have just bought an electric kiln and have "Mastering Cone 6 Glazes" . I
was schooled in reduction ^8-10 and am more than a tad nervous about the
whole endeavor of oxidation firings at cone 6. To me even the Gertsley
Borate glazes often look flat with oxidation ^6. My favorite glazes that I
learned on were Albany slip with rutile oxide decorations, the iron based
celadon when it went blue sea green, and Shino. I do not want to carry on
the error of using GB. I'm working in a very small space and don't really
want to buy more that a half dozen bags of ingredients. In any case I can't
seem to kick start myself into beginning. I find that even though I used to
make up our glazes for reduction firings that I don't know what silica to
use for the base glazes out of MC6G... We never used silica as the
ingredient "Silica" and my catalogs don't have anything listed in that form
that appears to be a glaze ingredient. Now I have given much more
information that anyone cares to read or is interested in..... Mostly I'm
looking for some kind of nudge to get me in gear.



--
David Hewitt

 




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