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sealing an oxidized silver ring



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 23rd 08, 02:38 AM posted to rec.crafts.jewelry
horatioB
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Posts: 1
Default sealing an oxidized silver ring

I am oxidizing a silver ring so that it looks black. The problem is
the oxidization wears off after time especially since it is a ring. I
am using liver of sulphur to oxidize the silver. Does anyone know of
a different process or some sort of seal that would keep the
oxidization on the ring longer. I have heard of using clean nail
polish but it makes the pieces shiny which i would like to avoid.

Thank you,
hb
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  #2  
Old April 23rd 08, 08:51 AM posted to rec.crafts.jewelry
mbstevens
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Posts: 165
Default sealing an oxidized silver ring

horatioB wrote:
I am oxidizing a silver ring so that it looks black. The problem is
the oxidization wears off after time especially since it is a ring. I
am using liver of sulphur to oxidize the silver. Does anyone know of
a different process or some sort of seal that would keep the
oxidization on the ring longer. I have heard of using clean nail
polish but it makes the pieces shiny which i would like to avoid.

Thank you,
hb



Niello, enamel, and plating would be worth investigating.



  #3  
Old April 23rd 08, 09:03 AM posted to rec.crafts.jewelry
Peter W.. Rowe,
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Posts: 355
Default sealing an oxidized silver ring

On Tue, 22 Apr 2008 18:38:03 -0700, in rec.crafts.jewelry horatioB
wrote:

I am oxidizing a silver ring so that it looks black. The problem is
the oxidization wears off after time especially since it is a ring. I
am using liver of sulphur to oxidize the silver. Does anyone know of
a different process or some sort of seal that would keep the
oxidization on the ring longer. I have heard of using clean nail
polish but it makes the pieces shiny which i would like to avoid.

Thank you,
hb


The nail polish sorta works, but it's not all that nice a solution. Kind of
denies the nature of the material...

Oxidized surfaces on silver have traditionally been used because silver does
this on it's own, naturally, so doing it intentionally not only gives the artist
some control over the look, but makes the piece look older, sometimes a desired
impression (thus the term "antiquing" is sometimes used for this too.)

Normally, the black is applied to recessed or more protected areas, and lightly
buffed off of high spots, resulting in a finish that closely mimics what time
will do, and the way time will maintain the finish in use.

If you want an overall black, even on high spots, you're then battling the
nature of wear and tear, but there are some things you can do that will slow
this down.

Plain blackened surfaces, straight from the liver of sulphur, are a dull black,
in which the sulphide (we call it oxidizing, but it's actually a sulphide that's
formed) is a somewhat loose and porous surface film. This surface wears off
somewhat more quickly than it could if compacted. If, after blackening, you use
a soft brass or nickle silver scratch brush, wet with soap or similar lubricant,
the wire brush burnishes the sulphide down into the surface some, compacting it.
the result is no longer a totally dull black surface, but it becomes a sort of
blue/black or gunmetal color, with a low sheen to it. Very pretty, at least in
my opinion, and it's somewhat more durable than the original black surface.
Getting the best finish can take two or more applications like this. patina,
scratch brush, patina again, scratch brush again, till the color gets the depth
you want. Key is that the brush, used gently and lubricated, isn't abrasive the
way it would be if used dry. You can get hand brushes called "platers" brushes
that are an especially fine guage of brass wire in the brush, so it's a very
soft and gentle brush. Works great for this.

The other thing you can do is in how you texture or define the original surface.
High spots wear off before low spots, and if your surface is deeply textured or
carved, most of it can be essentially, low spots, so the black will wear off the
overall surface more slowly. Hammer textures or carved, engraved, roll printed,
or other textures will all function this way. Even subtle textures like a sand
blast or bead blast surface will have their blackened color wear down more
slowly than a smooth polished surface would do. And the texture of some of
these, like the sand blast, also will give you a much deeper color, since the
texture greatly increases the overall surface area.

Hope that helps.

Peter
  #4  
Old April 24th 08, 04:50 AM posted to rec.crafts.jewelry
Rick
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default sealing an oxidized silver ring

You could also replace the silver band with one made from niobium- it can be
heated to produce a black oxide on the surface, which is quite durable.

Rick Hamilton
"Peter W.. Rowe," wrote in message
...
On Tue, 22 Apr 2008 18:38:03 -0700, in rec.crafts.jewelry horatioB
wrote:

I am oxidizing a silver ring so that it looks black. The problem is
the oxidization wears off after time especially since it is a ring. I
am using liver of sulphur to oxidize the silver. Does anyone know of
a different process or some sort of seal that would keep the
oxidization on the ring longer. I have heard of using clean nail
polish but it makes the pieces shiny which i would like to avoid.

Thank you,
hb


The nail polish sorta works, but it's not all that nice a solution. Kind
of
denies the nature of the material...

Oxidized surfaces on silver have traditionally been used because silver
does
this on it's own, naturally, so doing it intentionally not only gives the
artist
some control over the look, but makes the piece look older, sometimes a
desired
impression (thus the term "antiquing" is sometimes used for this too.)

Normally, the black is applied to recessed or more protected areas, and
lightly
buffed off of high spots, resulting in a finish that closely mimics what
time
will do, and the way time will maintain the finish in use.

If you want an overall black, even on high spots, you're then battling the
nature of wear and tear, but there are some things you can do that will
slow
this down.

Plain blackened surfaces, straight from the liver of sulphur, are a dull
black,
in which the sulphide (we call it oxidizing, but it's actually a sulphide
that's
formed) is a somewhat loose and porous surface film. This surface wears
off
somewhat more quickly than it could if compacted. If, after blackening,
you use
a soft brass or nickle silver scratch brush, wet with soap or similar
lubricant,
the wire brush burnishes the sulphide down into the surface some,
compacting it.
the result is no longer a totally dull black surface, but it becomes a
sort of
blue/black or gunmetal color, with a low sheen to it. Very pretty, at
least in
my opinion, and it's somewhat more durable than the original black
surface.
Getting the best finish can take two or more applications like this.
patina,
scratch brush, patina again, scratch brush again, till the color gets the
depth
you want. Key is that the brush, used gently and lubricated, isn't
abrasive the
way it would be if used dry. You can get hand brushes called "platers"
brushes
that are an especially fine guage of brass wire in the brush, so it's a
very
soft and gentle brush. Works great for this.

The other thing you can do is in how you texture or define the original
surface.
High spots wear off before low spots, and if your surface is deeply
textured or
carved, most of it can be essentially, low spots, so the black will wear
off the
overall surface more slowly. Hammer textures or carved, engraved, roll
printed,
or other textures will all function this way. Even subtle textures like a
sand
blast or bead blast surface will have their blackened color wear down more
slowly than a smooth polished surface would do. And the texture of some
of
these, like the sand blast, also will give you a much deeper color, since
the
texture greatly increases the overall surface area.

Hope that helps.

Peter



  #5  
Old April 24th 08, 04:58 AM posted to rec.crafts.jewelry
Peter W.. Rowe,
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 355
Default sealing an oxidized silver ring

On Wed, 23 Apr 2008 20:50:39 -0700, in rec.crafts.jewelry "Rick"
wrote:

You could also replace the silver band with one made from niobium- it can be
heated to produce a black oxide on the surface, which is quite durable.

Rick Hamilton


Or titanium, which also can heat treat to a nice durable oxide, though the
niobium black is a deeper/darker color. The titanium is somewhat harder and
more durable, which is nice, and a whole heck of a lot cheaper, which is very
nice.

Both metals, though, make poor suggestions for many people, since they cannot be
soldered via the usual methods used with silver, so fabricating a ring from them
can require major changes in the design to allow cold connections like rivets or
screws, machining parts from solid stock instead of forming from sheet, or other
means of not needing to solder parts together or seams closed. So a direct
substitution of these reactive metals for the silver is often not practical. But
it's still a good thing to remember that these metals can be colored like that.
Titanium in particular is interesting for heat coloring, since more modest
heating gives a lovely and fairly intense dark purplish blue, rather unusual by
itself, and impossible as a mere patina color on other metals.

Both metals can be given a wide range of colors by electrolytic anodizing.
Again, the colors on niobium are more intense, but the titanium, especially if
starting with a matte or sandblast or etches surface, is pretty darn intense
too.

Peter
 




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