A crafts forum. CraftBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » CraftBanter forum » Craft related newsgroups » Knots
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Help me identify 'Iron Knot'. A 'self releasing knot'.



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old July 6th 09, 04:21 AM posted to rec.crafts.knots
DantesBeard
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Help me identify 'Iron Knot'. A 'self releasing knot'.

I hope someone here can help me with instructions for a knot.
A few years ago, a guy showed me what he called an 'Iron Knot'. It
will hold any weight, even up to the breaking point of the rope, but
when the tension is released the knot comes apart. Useful for lowering
buckets off a roof for example. When the bucket lands on the ground,
the knot falls open and you can pull the rope back up.

It was practical and elegantly simple. And I forgot how to make it
before I made notes.
I'd be grateful for any help so I can stop kicking myself.

Best, and thanks,
DB.
  #2  
Old July 6th 09, 04:54 PM posted to rec.crafts.knots
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default Help me identify 'Iron Knot'. A 'self releasing knot'.

On Jul 5, 8:21*pm, DantesBeard wrote:
I hope someone here can help me with instructions for a knot.
A few years ago, a guy showed me what he called an 'Iron Knot'. It
will hold any weight, even up to the breaking point of the rope, but
when the tension is released the knot comes apart. Useful for lowering
buckets off a roof for example. When the bucket lands on the ground,
the knot falls open and you can pull the rope back up.

It was practical and elegantly simple. And I forgot how to make it
before I made notes.
I'd be grateful for any help so I can stop kicking myself.

Best, and thanks,
DB.


You may have seen a half hitch arranged in a certain way, such that
its nipped end is placed on the far side of the object. Something
like this:

http://www.ruckus.org/albums/album26/half_hitch.gif

Depending on the rope and the object, it may not spring open and self
release when you want. And using such a trick may result in a spilled
load.

You may also want to look at this hitch:

http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/tumblehitch.html
  #3  
Old July 8th 09, 01:05 AM posted to rec.crafts.knots
DantesBeard
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Help me identify 'Iron Knot'. A 'self releasing knot'.

On Jul 6, 9:54 am, wrote:
On Jul 5, 8:21 pm, DantesBeard wrote:

I hope someone here can help me with instructions for a knot.
A few years ago, a guy showed me what he called an 'Iron Knot'. It
will hold any weight, even up to the breaking point of the rope, but
when the tension is released the knot comes apart. Useful for lowering
buckets off a roof for example. When the bucket lands on the ground,
the knot falls open and you can pull the rope back up.


It was practical and elegantly simple. And I forgot how to make it
before I made notes.
I'd be grateful for any help so I can stop kicking myself.


Best, and thanks,
DB.


You may have seen a half hitch arranged in a certain way, such that
its nipped end is placed on the far side of the object. Something
like this:

http://www.ruckus.org/albums/album26/half_hitch.gif

Depending on the rope and the object, it may not spring open and self
release when you want. And using such a trick may result in a spilled
load.

You may also want to look at this hitch:

http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/tumblehitch.html


Thank you for the leads. the Tumblehitch is similar to what I can
recall, but you have to draw the opposite end to release it. I think
the Iron Knot did have a loop which was nipped or trapped. I think I
made a comment at the time that it seemed similar to how I was taught
to tie a Bowline with one hand, the 'standing part remaining passive'
just like in the Tumblehitch instructions.

Thanks again,
The search continues...
DB
  #4  
Old July 8th 09, 02:51 PM posted to rec.crafts.knots
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default Help me identify 'Iron Knot'. A 'self releasing knot'.

On Jul 7, 5:05*pm, DantesBeard wrote:
On Jul 6, 9:54 am, wrote:





On Jul 5, 8:21 pm, DantesBeard wrote:


I hope someone here can help me with instructions for a knot.
A few years ago, a guy showed me what he called an 'Iron Knot'. It
will hold any weight, even up to the breaking point of the rope, but
when the tension is released the knot comes apart. Useful for lowering
buckets off a roof for example. When the bucket lands on the ground,
the knot falls open and you can pull the rope back up.


It was practical and elegantly simple. And I forgot how to make it
before I made notes.
I'd be grateful for any help so I can stop kicking myself.


Best, and thanks,
DB.


You may have seen a half hitch arranged in a certain way, such that
its nipped end is placed on the far side of the object. *Something
like this:


http://www.ruckus.org/albums/album26/half_hitch.gif


Depending on the rope and the object, it may not spring open and self
release when you want. *And using such a trick may result in a spilled
load.


You may also want to look at this hitch:


http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/tumblehitch.html


Thank you for the leads. the Tumblehitch is similar to what I can
recall, but you have to draw the opposite end to release it. I think
the Iron Knot did have a loop which was nipped or trapped. I think I
made a comment at the time that it seemed similar to how I was taught
to tie a Bowline with one hand, the 'standing part remaining passive'
just like in the Tumblehitch instructions.

Thanks again,
The search continues...
DB- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Since you bring up the Bowline, another knot form that I had in mind
was a partial or uncompleted bowline. It is quite unstable, but can
be made a little more stable in pliable rope by winding the rabbit up
the tree instead of going down the hole. It's related to the bell-
ringer's knot discussed he

http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/spanloop.html

see also:

http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/bowline.html

(second step)

  #5  
Old July 8th 09, 07:52 PM posted to rec.crafts.knots
F Long
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Help me identify 'Iron Knot'. A 'self releasing knot'.

On Wed, 8 Jul 2009 06:51:54 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

On Jul 7, 5:05*pm, DantesBeard wrote:
On Jul 6, 9:54 am, wrote:





On Jul 5, 8:21 pm, DantesBeard wrote:


I hope someone here can help me with instructions for a knot.
A few years ago, a guy showed me what he called an 'Iron Knot'. It
will hold any weight, even up to the breaking point of the rope, but
when the tension is released the knot comes apart. Useful for lowering
buckets off a roof for example. When the bucket lands on the ground,
the knot falls open and you can pull the rope back up.


It was practical and elegantly simple. And I forgot how to make it
before I made notes.
I'd be grateful for any help so I can stop kicking myself.


Best, and thanks,
DB.


You may have seen a half hitch arranged in a certain way, such that
its nipped end is placed on the far side of the object. *Something
like this:


http://www.ruckus.org/albums/album26/half_hitch.gif

Depending on the rope and the object, it may not spring open and self
release when you want. *And using such a trick may result in a spilled
load.


You may also want to look at this hitch:


http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/tumblehitch.html


Thank you for the leads. the Tumblehitch is similar to what I can
recall, but you have to draw the opposite end to release it. I think
the Iron Knot did have a loop which was nipped or trapped. I think I
made a comment at the time that it seemed similar to how I was taught
to tie a Bowline with one hand, the 'standing part remaining passive'
just like in the Tumblehitch instructions.

Thanks again,
The search continues...
DB- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Since you bring up the Bowline, another knot form that I had in mind
was a partial or uncompleted bowline. It is quite unstable, but can
be made a little more stable in pliable rope by winding the rabbit up
the tree instead of going down the hole. It's related to the bell-
ringer's knot discussed he

http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/spanloop.html

see also:

http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/bowline.html

(second step)

  #6  
Old July 8th 09, 09:43 PM posted to rec.crafts.knots
F Long
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Help me identify 'Iron Knot'. A 'self releasing knot'.

On Wed, 08 Jul 2009 14:52:57 -0400, F Long
wrote:

On Wed, 8 Jul 2009 06:51:54 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

On Jul 7, 5:05*pm, DantesBeard wrote:
On Jul 6, 9:54 am, wrote:





On Jul 5, 8:21 pm, DantesBeard wrote:

I hope someone here can help me with instructions for a knot.
A few years ago, a guy showed me what he called an 'Iron Knot'. It
will hold any weight, even up to the breaking point of the rope, but
when the tension is released the knot comes apart. Useful for lowering
buckets off a roof for example. When the bucket lands on the ground,
the knot falls open and you can pull the rope back up.

It was practical and elegantly simple. And I forgot how to make it
before I made notes.
I'd be grateful for any help so I can stop kicking myself.

Best, and thanks,
DB.

You may have seen a half hitch arranged in a certain way, such that
its nipped end is placed on the far side of the object. *Something
like this:

http://www.ruckus.org/albums/album26/half_hitch.gif

Depending on the rope and the object, it may not spring open and self
release when you want. *And using such a trick may result in a spilled
load.

You may also want to look at this hitch:

http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/tumblehitch.html

Thank you for the leads. the Tumblehitch is similar to what I can
recall, but you have to draw the opposite end to release it. I think
the Iron Knot did have a loop which was nipped or trapped. I think I
made a comment at the time that it seemed similar to how I was taught
to tie a Bowline with one hand, the 'standing part remaining passive'
just like in the Tumblehitch instructions.

Thanks again,
The search continues...
DB- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Since you bring up the Bowline, another knot form that I had in mind
was a partial or uncompleted bowline. It is quite unstable, but can
be made a little more stable in pliable rope by winding the rabbit up
the tree instead of going down the hole. It's related to the bell-
ringer's knot discussed he

http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/spanloop.html

see also:

http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/bowline.html

(second step)

Hmn, earlier post came untied.

Have you considered the Awning Hitch?
  #7  
Old July 10th 09, 09:19 PM posted to rec.crafts.knots
Dan Lehman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default Help me identify 'Iron Knot'. A 'self releasing knot'.

On Jul 8, 9:51*am, wrote:

Since you bring up the Bowline, another knot form that I had in mind
was a partial or uncompleted bowline. *It is quite unstable, but can
be made a little more stable in pliable rope by winding the rabbit up
the tree instead of going down the hole. * It's related to the bell-
ringer's knot discussed he


I think that this is on the right track, although it would
be nice to somehow nail the origin of this "Iron Knot".

There is some variance to how well the Bellringer's knot can perform.
One way to I think improve both the knot's holding AND releasing,
and get some better wear resistance to boot,
is to make a fixed eyeknot in the end of the line,
and to size this so that its double strands will be what bear the
load, and its bight-end will be what is nipped by that Bowlinesque
turn -- the twin tension on the bight will better resist capsizing
forces of the nip, and should maybe also better help spring
apart and better free themselves with some helpful rope shaking.
The pre-tied eyeknot just makes this twin-loaded bight possible,
vs. trying some other way of involving multiple strands in the
nipping turn. Maybe works best if minimal bight-end is brought
through the nip (set & load carefully).

I just tried playing around with some other constructs, and there
seemed
an annoying risk that the release wouldn't go as hoped, and one would
end up with a simple but at least some-force-sustaining knot in the
rope when one wanted it to come free. (easily freed by a groundman)
(Heck, using 3/4" manila, hoisting 62.5# of wgt.s, I ended up
loosening
an Overhand eyeknot in this system before I shook free the nip !!
HUH?!)

--dl*
====


  #8  
Old August 24th 12, 12:11 AM posted to rec.crafts.knots
DantesBeard
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Help me identify 'Iron Knot'. A 'self releasing knot'.

On Sunday, July 5, 2009 8:21:16 PM UTC-7, DantesBeard wrote:
I hope someone here can help me with instructions for a knot. A few years ago, a guy showed me what he called an 'Iron Knot'. It will hold any weight, even up to the breaking point of the rope, but when the tension is released the knot comes apart. Useful for lowering buckets off a roof for example. When the bucket lands on the ground, the knot falls open and you can pull the rope back up.It was practical and elegantly simple. And I forgot how to make it before I made notes. I'd be grateful for any help so I can stop kicking myself.Best, and thanks,DB.


Hello fellow knotheads. I'm still looking for the elusive Iron Knot.

Best, and thanks,
DB
  #9  
Old March 3rd 13, 07:36 PM posted to rec.crafts.knots
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Help me identify 'Iron Knot'. A 'self releasing knot'.

2013-03-03-03-03-... ::

Yes, it's an old thread, but with an unanswered question, still.

It would help to post this to the IGKT's forum at
www.igkt.net/sm, under Practical Knots.

And it would help to have some details on :
1) what rope you've tried this knot in (or in which
you saw it tied & used) --or did you even do this,
or otherwise only get some tying instruction but
never actual-factual usage?

2) how quickly/simply tied it was (just to try to better
understand what might be its brevity of structure);

3) how many strands of rope ran through the hypothetical
bucket handle --just one, or a bight (pair) ?!

These clues might guide some imagination towards re-discovering
the mysterious-so-far "Iron knot". --or something else as effective.

Cheers,
--dl*
====
  #10  
Old February 3rd 19, 10:40 PM posted to rec.crafts.knots
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Help me identify 'Iron Knot'. A 'self releasing knot'.

I climb coconut trees and we wonder how to tie a knot we can then loosen ourselves....

alas after failing trying to reinvent the wheel, we tried tying a simple Single Sheet Bend with 1/2" climbing rope under tension (full rack of coconuts about 180lb), and was all we ever needed! Make sure to have as short of a tail end as will hold the knot.

For buckets: 550 paracord and Voila!

It took playing around with rope types/widths to find which one works best for each application. It's not "The Iron Knot" but it works.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Chinese Button Knot vs Lanyard Knot? Blind Willy Reed Knots 0 December 2nd 07 03:42 PM
Does anyone know this knot? lismoreboy Knots 7 July 14th 05 07:04 AM
Knot Heads Knot Art Gallery Beta... Knot Head Knots 2 July 3rd 04 02:28 PM
Need help with a knot... BeerBoy Knots 5 June 2nd 04 12:12 AM
Is there a name for this knot? Icarus Knots 10 March 2nd 04 12:14 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2020 CraftBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.