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Doug Porter
September 12th 03, 03:40 PM
I have an Olympic 2827 with Controller. The controller has 4
preprogrammed firing schedules---slow/fast bisque, slow/fast glaze.
I've done my own programming for the bisque firing (mainly on the slow
side) but was wondering what the difference is in the glaze firing.
Why would one choose fast over slow or vice versa (sp?).

sandi
September 12th 03, 07:56 PM
I have a kiln with a controller like that and I always use the slow bisque.
Still had two pieces explode last night. I think you would use the fast
bisque when you have a small load and you know the pieces are totally bone
dry. Sandi
"Doug Porter" > wrote in message
...
> I have an Olympic 2827 with Controller. The controller has 4
> preprogrammed firing schedules---slow/fast bisque, slow/fast glaze.
> I've done my own programming for the bisque firing (mainly on the slow
> side) but was wondering what the difference is in the glaze firing.
> Why would one choose fast over slow or vice versa (sp?).
>

Steve Mills
September 13th 03, 12:10 AM
I don't think you can take the early stages of a bisque firing (up to
red heat) too slowly.

Steve


In article >, sandi
> writes
>I have a kiln with a controller like that and I always use the slow bisque.
>Still had two pieces explode last night. I think you would use the fast
>bisque when you have a small load and you know the pieces are totally bone
>dry. Sandi
>"Doug Porter" > wrote in message
...
>> I have an Olympic 2827 with Controller. The controller has 4
>> preprogrammed firing schedules---slow/fast bisque, slow/fast glaze.
>> I've done my own programming for the bisque firing (mainly on the slow
>> side) but was wondering what the difference is in the glaze firing.
>> Why would one choose fast over slow or vice versa (sp?).
>>
>
>

--
Steve Mills
Bath
UK

annemarie
September 13th 03, 01:08 AM
"sandi" > wrote in message
. ..
> I have a kiln with a controller like that and I always use the slow
bisque.
> Still had two pieces explode last night. I think you would use the fast
> bisque when you have a small load and you know the pieces are totally bone
> dry. Sandi
>
Also very fine. If it is a bit thick a fast bisque will make it explode.
I take bisque up 100C per hour to 600C then flat out to !000C this works for
my own usually quite fine work and my childrens classes work. I rarely get
anything exploding, I am careful about air bubbles in my own work and the
childrens work though.

For glaze I take it up 150C per hour to 300C then flat out to what ever
temp/cone suits the clay and glaze.
Annemarie

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