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Gretl IoW
July 19th 03, 06:48 PM
how long are elements expected to last in stoneware firings?

psci_kw
July 19th 03, 08:34 PM
"Gretl IoW" > wrote in message
...
> how long are elements expected to last in stoneware firings?

Gretl, you need to supply much more information:
What elements are you referring to? Electric coils for heating a kiln?
Elements that make up a clay body? How old is the kiln, how long are you
firing, and at what cone or temperature? Is the kiln located inside or
outside.
There are a lot of variables that affect heating elements, including usage,
and external things like whether or not salt is being used in the firing, or
how often things have "gone boom" inside the kiln. Assuming you are speaking
of electrical heating elements, I have seen elements for a kiln used only
for bisquing last 20 years (so far), and elements used in an electric kiln
used for salt firing last only one year before corroding. That's not much
help, I know, but I don't have a lot to go on.

Hope that helps?
Wayne in Key West

Brad Sondahl
July 20th 03, 01:28 AM
They can last a hundred firings. It's good to keep a log of your
firings (I make a chart with a column for bisques and one for glazes. )
I change my elements when the kiln seems to be taking too long to get to
glaze temperature without any bad connections, burn outs, etc. Usually
that is about two years, or 150 firings.


Gretl IoW wrote:

> how long are elements expected to last in stoneware firings?

--
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http://sondahl.com
Pottery sales page http://sondahl.freeyellow.com
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Steve Mills
July 20th 03, 06:08 PM
One technique that can prolong element life is to fire them in the empty
kiln to red heat (say 750oC) after installation, this puts a protective
and VERY thin layer of oxide on the surface. Any subsequent firing that
creates a mild reduction atmosphere in the kiln will degrade this oxide
layer so it will need to be re-established with another clean firing.
Hence the mentioned longevity of biscuit kiln elements.

Not all element suppliers give you this information sadly.

Steve
Bath
UK


In article >, Brad Sondahl
> writes
>They can last a hundred firings. It's good to keep a log of your
>firings (I make a chart with a column for bisques and one for glazes. )
>I change my elements when the kiln seems to be taking too long to get to
>glaze temperature without any bad connections, burn outs, etc. Usually
>that is about two years, or 150 firings.
>
>
>Gretl IoW wrote:
>
>> how long are elements expected to last in stoneware firings?
>
>--
>For original art, music, pottery, and literature, visit my homepage
>http://sondahl.com
>Pottery sales page http://sondahl.freeyellow.com
>My music site at mp3.com http://www.mp3.com/stations/sondahl
>
>

--
Steve Mills
Bath
UK

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